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Vietnam War Reader : A Documentary History from American and Vietnamese Perspectives

By: Hunt, Michael H.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, 2010Edition: 1st ed.Description: 1 online resource (256 p.).ISBN: 9780807895801.Subject(s): Electronic books. -- local | Vietnam War, 1961-1975 -- SourcesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Vietnam War Reader : A Documentary History from American and Vietnamese PerspectivesDDC classification: 959.7043 LOC classification: DS557.4 -- .V626 2010Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Preface; Introduction. The Vietnam War: From Myth to History; Guide to Abbreviations; Chronology; Map of Vietnam; 1. The Setting: Colonialism and the Cold War (to 1954); Emergence of a Nationalist Vision; 1.1 Nguyen Dinh Chieu, funeral oration, 1861; 1.2 Phan Boi Chau, call for Vietnamese to awaken, 1907; 1.3 Phan Chu Trinh, open letter to the French governor-general, 1907; Ho Chi Minh's Rise to Prominence, 1919-1945; 1.4 Recollections of discovering Communist anticolonialism in July 1920; 1.5 Statement on behalf of the Indochinese Communist Party, 18 February 1930
1.6 Proclamation of the Viet Minh-led independence struggle, 6 June 19411.7 Declaration of independence, 2 September 1945; The Popular Appeal of Revolution; 1.8 Nguyen Thi Dinh on her political awakening in the 1930s; 1.9 Truong Nhu Tang on his conversion to the nationalist cause in the mid-1940s; 1.10 Peasants in the Red River Delta on the Viet Minh in the late 1940s; Deepening U.S. Engagement in Indochina, 1943-1954; 1.11 U.S. policy shifts from self-determination to containment, 1943-1950; 1.12 Ho Chi Minh, denunciation of U.S. intervention, January 1952
1.13 The Eisenhower administration on the French collapse, March-April 19542. Drawing the Lines of Conflict, 1954-1963; A Country Divided or United? July 1954-December 1960; 2.1 Ho Chi Minh, report to the Communist Party Central Committee, 15 July 1954; 2.2 "Final Declaration of the Geneva Conference," 21 July 1954; 2.3 The Eisenhower administration on the Geneva accords, July and October 1954; 2.4 Ngo Dinh Diem, speech to the Council on Foreign Relations, 13 May 1957; 2.5 Hanoi goes on the offensive, 1959-1960; The Perspective of NLF Activists
2.6 Le Van Chan, interview on rural organizing during the late 1950s2.7 Regroupees interviewed on returning to the South in the early 1960s; Reacting to NLF Success, 1961-1963; 2.8 The Kennedy administration wrestles with an insurgency, November 1961; 2.9 Central Intelligence Agency, secret memo on the NLF, 29 November 1963; The Diem Regime in Crisis, July-November 1963; 2.10 John F. Kennedy, press conference, 17 July 1963; 2.11 Diem, press interview, 26 July 1963; 2.12 Communist leaders' appraisals of the U.S. position, summer and fall 1963
2.13 The Kennedy administration contemplates a coup, August-November 19633. From Proxy War to Direct Conflict, 1963-1965; The Saigon Government on the Ropes, November 1963-August 1965; 3.1 A new president faces an old problem, November-December 1963; 3.2 Communist Party Central Committee, resolution 9, December 1963; 3.3 PAVN officer, interview on the military effort, 1963-1964; 3.4 James B. Lincoln, letter comparing Vietnamese forces, 14 August 1965; Johnson Escalates, August 1964-April 1965; 3.5 Tonkin Gulf resolution approved by Congress, 10 August 1964
3.6 McGeorge Bundy to Lyndon Johnson, 7 February 1965
Summary: An essential new resource for students and teachers of the Vietnam War, this concise collection of primary sources opens a valuable window on an extraordinarily complex conflict. The materials gathered here, from both the American and Vietnamese sides, remind readers that the conflict touched the lives of many people in a wide range of social and political situations and spanned a good deal more time than the decade of direct U.S. combat. Indeed, the U.S. war was but one phase in a string of conflicts that varied significantly in character and geography. Michael Hunt brings together the views of the conflict's disparate players--from Communist leaders, Vietnamese peasants, Saigon loyalists, and North Vietnamese soldiers to U.S. policymakers, soldiers, and critics of the war. By allowing the participants to speak, this volume encourages readers to formulate their own historically grounded understanding of a still controversial struggle.
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DS557.4 -- .V626 2010 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=515687 Available EBL515687

Contents; Preface; Introduction. The Vietnam War: From Myth to History; Guide to Abbreviations; Chronology; Map of Vietnam; 1. The Setting: Colonialism and the Cold War (to 1954); Emergence of a Nationalist Vision; 1.1 Nguyen Dinh Chieu, funeral oration, 1861; 1.2 Phan Boi Chau, call for Vietnamese to awaken, 1907; 1.3 Phan Chu Trinh, open letter to the French governor-general, 1907; Ho Chi Minh's Rise to Prominence, 1919-1945; 1.4 Recollections of discovering Communist anticolonialism in July 1920; 1.5 Statement on behalf of the Indochinese Communist Party, 18 February 1930

1.6 Proclamation of the Viet Minh-led independence struggle, 6 June 19411.7 Declaration of independence, 2 September 1945; The Popular Appeal of Revolution; 1.8 Nguyen Thi Dinh on her political awakening in the 1930s; 1.9 Truong Nhu Tang on his conversion to the nationalist cause in the mid-1940s; 1.10 Peasants in the Red River Delta on the Viet Minh in the late 1940s; Deepening U.S. Engagement in Indochina, 1943-1954; 1.11 U.S. policy shifts from self-determination to containment, 1943-1950; 1.12 Ho Chi Minh, denunciation of U.S. intervention, January 1952

1.13 The Eisenhower administration on the French collapse, March-April 19542. Drawing the Lines of Conflict, 1954-1963; A Country Divided or United? July 1954-December 1960; 2.1 Ho Chi Minh, report to the Communist Party Central Committee, 15 July 1954; 2.2 "Final Declaration of the Geneva Conference," 21 July 1954; 2.3 The Eisenhower administration on the Geneva accords, July and October 1954; 2.4 Ngo Dinh Diem, speech to the Council on Foreign Relations, 13 May 1957; 2.5 Hanoi goes on the offensive, 1959-1960; The Perspective of NLF Activists

2.6 Le Van Chan, interview on rural organizing during the late 1950s2.7 Regroupees interviewed on returning to the South in the early 1960s; Reacting to NLF Success, 1961-1963; 2.8 The Kennedy administration wrestles with an insurgency, November 1961; 2.9 Central Intelligence Agency, secret memo on the NLF, 29 November 1963; The Diem Regime in Crisis, July-November 1963; 2.10 John F. Kennedy, press conference, 17 July 1963; 2.11 Diem, press interview, 26 July 1963; 2.12 Communist leaders' appraisals of the U.S. position, summer and fall 1963

2.13 The Kennedy administration contemplates a coup, August-November 19633. From Proxy War to Direct Conflict, 1963-1965; The Saigon Government on the Ropes, November 1963-August 1965; 3.1 A new president faces an old problem, November-December 1963; 3.2 Communist Party Central Committee, resolution 9, December 1963; 3.3 PAVN officer, interview on the military effort, 1963-1964; 3.4 James B. Lincoln, letter comparing Vietnamese forces, 14 August 1965; Johnson Escalates, August 1964-April 1965; 3.5 Tonkin Gulf resolution approved by Congress, 10 August 1964

3.6 McGeorge Bundy to Lyndon Johnson, 7 February 1965

An essential new resource for students and teachers of the Vietnam War, this concise collection of primary sources opens a valuable window on an extraordinarily complex conflict. The materials gathered here, from both the American and Vietnamese sides, remind readers that the conflict touched the lives of many people in a wide range of social and political situations and spanned a good deal more time than the decade of direct U.S. combat. Indeed, the U.S. war was but one phase in a string of conflicts that varied significantly in character and geography. Michael Hunt brings together the views of the conflict's disparate players--from Communist leaders, Vietnamese peasants, Saigon loyalists, and North Vietnamese soldiers to U.S. policymakers, soldiers, and critics of the war. By allowing the participants to speak, this volume encourages readers to formulate their own historically grounded understanding of a still controversial struggle.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Editor Hunt (emer., history, UNC Chapel Hill) has compiled 102 documents that focus on the Americans and Vietnamese who fought the Vietnam War. Hunt's purpose is to illustrate to students and teachers the various perspectives on the conflict. He provides insightful overviews of the themes and issues raised in each chapter and strives to minimize his own views. Hunt describes how Hollywood movies became the single most important source of information on the war for Americans. These movies, along with polling data, show that popular conceptions focus on what the war did to the US and to American soldiers and leave little room for the impact of the war on the Vietnamese. The documents, which cover the period from 1861 to the end of the 20th century, give equal space to the Vietnamese point of view (though less than 10 percent of the documents represent the South Vietnamese point of view). Most give perspectives on the war of senior government officials. Hunt's editorial comments are most helpful and illustrate his broad knowledge of the war. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Twentieth-century US history collections supporting lower- and upper-level undergraduates. P. Brush Vanderbilt University

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