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War That Never Ends : New Perspectives on the Vietnam War

By: Anderson, David L.
Contributor(s): Ernst, John.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Lexington : The University Press of Kentucky, 2014Description: 1 online resource (378 p.).ISBN: 9780813145617.Subject(s): United States -- History -- 1945- | Vietnam -- History -- 1945-1975 | Vietnam War, 1961-1975 -- United States | Vietnam War, 1961-1975Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: War That Never Ends : New Perspectives on the Vietnam WarDDC classification: 959.704/3 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; The War That Never Ends; Title; Copyright; Contents; Dedications; Introduction: Why Vietnam Still Matters; 1. No More Vietnams: Historians Debate the Policy Lessons of the Vietnam War; 2. The United States and Vietnam: The Enemies; 3. With Friends Like These: Waging War and Seeking "More Flags"; 4. The Perspective of a Vietnamese Witness; 5. Ho Chi Minh, Confucianism, and Marxism; 6. Vietnam during the Rule of Ngo Dinh Diem, 1954-63; 7. The Buddhist Antiwar Movement; 8. The Long-Haired Warriors: Women and Revolution in Vietnam; 9. Military Dissent and the Legacy of the Vietnam War
10. Unpopular Messengers: Student Opposition to the Vietnam War11. Vietnam Is Here: The Antiwar Movement; 12. The Media and the Vietnam War; 13. Congress and the Vietnam War: Senate Doves and Their Impact on the War; 14. In the Valley: The Combat Infantryman and the Vietnam War; 15. The War That Never Seems to Go Away; 16. A Speech for LBJ with Comments on George W. Bush; List of Contributors; Index
Summary: More than three decades after the final withdrawal of American troops from Southeast Asia, the legacy of the Vietnam War continues to influence political, military, and cultural discourse. Journalists, politicians, scholars, pundits, and others have used the conflict to analyze each of America's subsequent military engagements. Many Americans have observed that Vietnam-era terms such as "cut and run," "quagmire," and "hearts and minds" are ubiquitous once again as comparisons between U.S. involvement in Iraq and in Vietnam seem increasingly appropriate. Because of its persistent significance, the Vietnam War era continues to inspire vibrant historical inquiry.The eminent scholars featured in The War That Never Ends offer fresh and insightful perspectives on the continuing relevance of the Vietnam War, from the homefront to "humping in the boonies," and from the great halls of political authority to the gritty hotbeds of oppositional activism. The contributors assert that the Vietnam War is central to understanding the politics of the Cold War, the social movements of the late twentieth century, the lasting effects of colonialism, the current direction of American foreign policy, and the ongoing economic development in Southeast Asia. The seventeen essays break new ground on questions relating to gender, religion, ideology, strategy, and public opinion, and the book gives equal emphasis to Vietnamese and American perspectives on the grueling conflict. The contributors examine such phenomena as the role of women in revolutionary organizations, the peace movements inspired by Buddhism, and Ho Chi Minh's successful adaptation of Marxism to local cultures. The War That Never Ends explores both the antiwar movement and the experiences of infantrymen on the front lines of battle, as well as the media's controversial coverage of America's involvement Summary: inthe war. The War That Never Ends sheds new light on the evolving historical meanings of the Vietnam War, its enduring influence, and its potential to influence future political and military decision-making, in times of peace as well as war.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
DS557.7 -- .W3675 2007 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1656401 Available EBL1656401

Cover; The War That Never Ends; Title; Copyright; Contents; Dedications; Introduction: Why Vietnam Still Matters; 1. No More Vietnams: Historians Debate the Policy Lessons of the Vietnam War; 2. The United States and Vietnam: The Enemies; 3. With Friends Like These: Waging War and Seeking "More Flags"; 4. The Perspective of a Vietnamese Witness; 5. Ho Chi Minh, Confucianism, and Marxism; 6. Vietnam during the Rule of Ngo Dinh Diem, 1954-63; 7. The Buddhist Antiwar Movement; 8. The Long-Haired Warriors: Women and Revolution in Vietnam; 9. Military Dissent and the Legacy of the Vietnam War

10. Unpopular Messengers: Student Opposition to the Vietnam War11. Vietnam Is Here: The Antiwar Movement; 12. The Media and the Vietnam War; 13. Congress and the Vietnam War: Senate Doves and Their Impact on the War; 14. In the Valley: The Combat Infantryman and the Vietnam War; 15. The War That Never Seems to Go Away; 16. A Speech for LBJ with Comments on George W. Bush; List of Contributors; Index

More than three decades after the final withdrawal of American troops from Southeast Asia, the legacy of the Vietnam War continues to influence political, military, and cultural discourse. Journalists, politicians, scholars, pundits, and others have used the conflict to analyze each of America's subsequent military engagements. Many Americans have observed that Vietnam-era terms such as "cut and run," "quagmire," and "hearts and minds" are ubiquitous once again as comparisons between U.S. involvement in Iraq and in Vietnam seem increasingly appropriate. Because of its persistent significance, the Vietnam War era continues to inspire vibrant historical inquiry.The eminent scholars featured in The War That Never Ends offer fresh and insightful perspectives on the continuing relevance of the Vietnam War, from the homefront to "humping in the boonies," and from the great halls of political authority to the gritty hotbeds of oppositional activism. The contributors assert that the Vietnam War is central to understanding the politics of the Cold War, the social movements of the late twentieth century, the lasting effects of colonialism, the current direction of American foreign policy, and the ongoing economic development in Southeast Asia. The seventeen essays break new ground on questions relating to gender, religion, ideology, strategy, and public opinion, and the book gives equal emphasis to Vietnamese and American perspectives on the grueling conflict. The contributors examine such phenomena as the role of women in revolutionary organizations, the peace movements inspired by Buddhism, and Ho Chi Minh's successful adaptation of Marxism to local cultures. The War That Never Ends explores both the antiwar movement and the experiences of infantrymen on the front lines of battle, as well as the media's controversial coverage of America's involvement

inthe war. The War That Never Ends sheds new light on the evolving historical meanings of the Vietnam War, its enduring influence, and its potential to influence future political and military decision-making, in times of peace as well as war.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This important collection of essays deals with opposition during the war in Vietnam, ranging from Buddhist resistance to the Diem regime, to dissent within the US military to US involvement in an Asian war, to the antiwar movement in the US and mounting criticism of the war in the Senate. There are also notable chapters on the life of the combat infantryman; whether Ho was a Confucian or a Marxist; the Vietnamese women of the revolution; LBJ's search for allies in the war; an analysis of Diem's rule; an evaluation of the relationship between the media and the war in Southeast Asia; and an assessment of US policy by a North Vietnamese scholar. The work ends with George Herring (to whom the essays are dedicated) trying to answer why this war "never seems to go away." The Vietnam War challenged both the belief in "American exceptionalism" and the concept of "American invincibility." Throughout the book, there are numerous references to and comparisons with the present war in Iraq. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. W. T. Lindley Union University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> David L. Anderson is professor of history in the Division of Social, Behavioral, and Global Studies at California State University, Monterey Bay, and past president of the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations. His publications include The Vietnam War and Shadow on the White House .</p> <p> John Ernst is professor of history at Morehead State University and the author of Forging a Fateful Alliance .</p>

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