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Bringing God to Men : American Military Chaplains and the Vietnam War

By: Whitt, Jacqueline E.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, 2014Edition: 1st ed.Description: 1 online resource (313 p.).ISBN: 9781469614526.Subject(s): Military chaplains -- United States -- Attitudes -- History -- 20th century | Military chaplains -- Vietnam -- Attitudes -- History -- 20th century | United States -- Armed Forces -- Chaplains -- History -- 20th century | Vietnam War, 1961-1975 -- Chaplains | Vietnam War, 1961-1975 -- Religious aspectsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Bringing God to Men : American Military Chaplains and the Vietnam WarDDC classification: 959.704/37 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; ONE: Consensus and Civil Religion; TWO: Duty and Relationships; THREE: Conflict and Identity; FOUR: Liturgy and Interpretation; FIVE: Discourse and Debate; SIX: Reflection and Reconciliation; SEVEN: Dissent and Mission; Conclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z
Summary: During the second half of the twentieth century, the American military chaplaincy underwent a profound transformation. Broad-based and ecumenical in the World War II era, the chaplaincy emerged from the Vietnam War as generally conservative and evangelical. Whitt foregrounds the voices of chaplains themselves to explore how those serving in Vietnam acted as vital links between diverse communities, working personally and publicly to reconcile apparent tensions between their various constituencies. Whitt also offers a unique perspective on the realities of religious practice in the war's foxholes and firebases, as chaplains ministered with a focus on soldiers' shared experiences rather than traditional theologies.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
DS559.64 -- .W47 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1663549 Available EBL1663549

Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; ONE: Consensus and Civil Religion; TWO: Duty and Relationships; THREE: Conflict and Identity; FOUR: Liturgy and Interpretation; FIVE: Discourse and Debate; SIX: Reflection and Reconciliation; SEVEN: Dissent and Mission; Conclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z

During the second half of the twentieth century, the American military chaplaincy underwent a profound transformation. Broad-based and ecumenical in the World War II era, the chaplaincy emerged from the Vietnam War as generally conservative and evangelical. Whitt foregrounds the voices of chaplains themselves to explore how those serving in Vietnam acted as vital links between diverse communities, working personally and publicly to reconcile apparent tensions between their various constituencies. Whitt also offers a unique perspective on the realities of religious practice in the war's foxholes and firebases, as chaplains ministered with a focus on soldiers' shared experiences rather than traditional theologies.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Whitt (Air War College) adds to the vast literature on the Vietnam conflict through her insightful, well-researched, and valuable analysis of military chaplains. Rather than focus on what many scholars would call the nexus of two or more domains, Whitt takes a more nuanced approach by emphasizing liminality, exposing the complexity of her subject. In so doing, she explicates the variant ways military chaplains are liminal, for they are military and religious, prophetic and pastoral, moral dissenters and active participants in a divisive environment. Making extensive use of limited official documents, scattered memoirs, and interviews, the author expertly creates an insightful narrative that enables readers to arrive at their own conclusion regarding whether faith is compatible with military obligations and service to one's country. Whitt takes readers from the onset of the conflict to the agony of coming to grips with the sense of alienation felt by returning veterans, chaplains included. Her study provides a "redemptive narrative" from the chaplains' perspective and, by extension, for many tormented veterans. Chaplains were able to "cooperate without compromising"--a lesson to heal the American psyche. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. G. Donato Bentley University

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