Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Vietnam War : A Study in the Making of American Policy

By: Sullivan, Michael P.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Lexington : The University Press of Kentucky, 2015Description: 1 online resource (209 p.).ISBN: 9780813164717.Subject(s): United States -- Foreign relations -- 1945-1989 | Vietnam War, 1961-1975 -- United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Vietnam War : A Study in the Making of American PolicyDDC classification: 959.704/3 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Title; Copyright ; Contents; Acknowledgments; 1 Vietnam: Competing Perspectives; 2 Vietnam as Vital: Myth or Reality?; 3 Decision-Making Models: Rational Policy or Quagmire?; 4 Moods and Public Opinion: Background for Decisions; 5 The Vietnam War, the Cold War, and Long-Term Trends; 6 The Lessons of Vietnam; References; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; Z
Summary: The war in Vietnam achieved almost none of the goals the American decision-makers formulated, and it cost more than 56,000 American lives. Yet, until recently, Americans have preferred to ignore the causes and consequences of this disaster by treating the war as an aberration in United States foreign policy, an unfortunate but unique mistake.What are the "lessons" of Vietnam? Many previous discussions have focused on narrow or misleading questions, rehashing military decisions, for example, or offering blow-by-blow accounts of Washington infighting, or castigating foreign-policy decision-makers. Michael Sullivan undertakes instead a broad and systematic treatment of the American experience in Vietnam, using a variety of theoretical perspectives to study several aspects of that experience, including the decision-making process and decision-makers' perceptions of the war; public opinion and "mood" before, during, and after the war; and the Vietnam War in relation to the Cold War and to power structures and patterns of violence in the international system.The major goal of The Vietnam War: A Study in the Making of American Policy is to show that the American experience, not only in Vietnam but elsewhere in the world, must be understood as an integral part of the processes of both American foreign policy and international politics. Sullivan demonstrates the importance of using a variety of empirical and quantitative evidence to study foreign policy and of relating a specific historical situation like the Vietnam War to broader theories of international relations.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
DS558 -- .S85 1985 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1915912 Available EBL1915912
Browsing UT Tyler Online Shelves , Shelving location: Online Close shelf browser
DS557.8.T4 M65 2017 The myths of Tet : DS558 -- .C66 2002 Companion to the Vietnam War. DS558 -- .L664 2015 Grunts : DS558 -- .S85 1985 Vietnam War : DS558 -- .T66 1998 Apocalypse Then : DS558 -- .V36 1995 Into the Quagmire : DS558 c1986 Intervention :

Cover; Title; Copyright ; Contents; Acknowledgments; 1 Vietnam: Competing Perspectives; 2 Vietnam as Vital: Myth or Reality?; 3 Decision-Making Models: Rational Policy or Quagmire?; 4 Moods and Public Opinion: Background for Decisions; 5 The Vietnam War, the Cold War, and Long-Term Trends; 6 The Lessons of Vietnam; References; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; Z

The war in Vietnam achieved almost none of the goals the American decision-makers formulated, and it cost more than 56,000 American lives. Yet, until recently, Americans have preferred to ignore the causes and consequences of this disaster by treating the war as an aberration in United States foreign policy, an unfortunate but unique mistake.What are the "lessons" of Vietnam? Many previous discussions have focused on narrow or misleading questions, rehashing military decisions, for example, or offering blow-by-blow accounts of Washington infighting, or castigating foreign-policy decision-makers. Michael Sullivan undertakes instead a broad and systematic treatment of the American experience in Vietnam, using a variety of theoretical perspectives to study several aspects of that experience, including the decision-making process and decision-makers' perceptions of the war; public opinion and "mood" before, during, and after the war; and the Vietnam War in relation to the Cold War and to power structures and patterns of violence in the international system.The major goal of The Vietnam War: A Study in the Making of American Policy is to show that the American experience, not only in Vietnam but elsewhere in the world, must be understood as an integral part of the processes of both American foreign policy and international politics. Sullivan demonstrates the importance of using a variety of empirical and quantitative evidence to study foreign policy and of relating a specific historical situation like the Vietnam War to broader theories of international relations.

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> Michael P. Sullivan is associate professor of political science at the University of Arizona and is the author of International Relations: Theories and Evidence .</p>

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.