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Free Will.

By: Campbell, Joseph Keim.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Polity Key Concepts in Philosophy: Publisher: Oxford : Wiley, 2013Description: 1 online resource (138 p.).ISBN: 9780745672885.Subject(s): Free will and determinismGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Free WillDDC classification: 123.5 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgments; 1: Free Will; 1.1 Why Care about Free Will?; 1.2 Free Will and Fatalism; 1.3 Time and Truth; 1.4 Foreknowledge; 1.5 Determinism; 2: Moral Responsibility; 2.1 Moral Responsibility; 2.2 Freedom and Epistemic Conditions; 2.3 Other Necessary Conditions; 2.4 The "Free Will" Crisis; 2.5 Moral Responsibility without Free Will; 3: The Problem of Free Will; 3.1 The First Argument; 3.2 The Third Argument; 3.3 The Mind Argument; 3.4 Free Will Skepticism; 4: Moral Responsibility: Incompatibilism and Skepticism; 4.1 The Direct Argument; 4.2 The Manipulation Argument
4.3 The Ultimacy Argument5: Free Will Theories; 5.1 Libertarianism; 5.2 Free Will Skepticism; 5.3 Compatibilism; 5.4 Alternative Views; 5.5 Final Thoughts; Notes; References; Index
Summary: What is free will? Why is it important? Can the same act be both free and determined? Is free will necessary for moral responsibility? Does anyone have free will, and if not, how is creativity possible and how can anyone be praised or blamed for anything?<br /><br />These are just some of the questions considered by Joseph Keim Campbell in this lively and accessible introduction to the concept of free will. Using a range of engaging examples the book introduces the problems, arguments, and theories surrounding free will. Beginning with a discussion of fatalism and causal determinism, the book
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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BJ1461 -- .C27 2011eb (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1174275 Available EBL1174275

Contents; Acknowledgments; 1: Free Will; 1.1 Why Care about Free Will?; 1.2 Free Will and Fatalism; 1.3 Time and Truth; 1.4 Foreknowledge; 1.5 Determinism; 2: Moral Responsibility; 2.1 Moral Responsibility; 2.2 Freedom and Epistemic Conditions; 2.3 Other Necessary Conditions; 2.4 The "Free Will" Crisis; 2.5 Moral Responsibility without Free Will; 3: The Problem of Free Will; 3.1 The First Argument; 3.2 The Third Argument; 3.3 The Mind Argument; 3.4 Free Will Skepticism; 4: Moral Responsibility: Incompatibilism and Skepticism; 4.1 The Direct Argument; 4.2 The Manipulation Argument

4.3 The Ultimacy Argument5: Free Will Theories; 5.1 Libertarianism; 5.2 Free Will Skepticism; 5.3 Compatibilism; 5.4 Alternative Views; 5.5 Final Thoughts; Notes; References; Index

What is free will? Why is it important? Can the same act be both free and determined? Is free will necessary for moral responsibility? Does anyone have free will, and if not, how is creativity possible and how can anyone be praised or blamed for anything?<br /><br />These are just some of the questions considered by Joseph Keim Campbell in this lively and accessible introduction to the concept of free will. Using a range of engaging examples the book introduces the problems, arguments, and theories surrounding free will. Beginning with a discussion of fatalism and causal determinism, the book

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Free will and determinism is a perennially popular subject taught in philosophy classes at all levels. It analyzes whether humans make free choices or whether inner and external factors influence their choices. This volume, one of an introductory series, explains this topic (with no historical background) using a contemporary analytic approach with British and American philosophers. Moral responsibility for human actions also is discussed. Campbell (Washington State Univ.) defines and interprets the important concepts with numerous useful examples, but he loads the pages with technical terms (e.g., epistemic, phenomenological) that typical beginners are unlikely to know. Moreover, he assumes that students have a strong philosophical vocabulary and know symbolic logic. Three of the five chapters are difficult for students to follow unless they have studied symbolic logic and have training in logical argumentation. The book is thoroughly researched (though more explanation of God's foreknowledge of the world would help). It includes a lengthy bibliography and a list of good movies. Clifford Williams's Free Will and Determinism: A Dialogue (1980), though very dated, is a much more simplified introduction to this puzzling topic. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students, faculty, and some undergraduate philosophy majors. M. P. Maller College of DuPage

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Joseph Keim Campbell is Assitant Professor of Philosophy at Washington State University

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