Sky Alert! : When Satellites Fail

By: Johnson, LesMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandSpringer Praxis Books: Publisher: New York : Springer, 2013Description: 1 online resource (199 p.)ISBN: 9781461418306Subject(s): Artificial satellitesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Sky Alert! : When Satellites FailDDC classification: 629.46 LOC classification: TL796 -- .J64 2013ebOnline resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Sky Alert!; Acknowledgment; About the Author; Contents; Chapter Summaries; Part 1: How We Might Lose Our Satellites; Part 2: If We Were to Lose Our Satellites...; Part 3: What Can We Do?; Introduction; References; Part 1 How We Might Lose Our Satellites; 1 Orbital Debris; References; 2 Space War; Nuclear Weapons; Electric Fire; Hackers; Space Rocks; Satellite Self-Detonation; References; 3 Solar Storms; References; Part 2 If We Were to Lose Our Satellites ...; 4 The Global Positioning System (Military Uses); Reference; 5 Economic Fallout; Very Small Aperture Terminals; Air Travel
The Next Generation Air Transportation System, or NextGenRail; Manufacturing; The Fishing Industry; Television; Satellite Radio; The Cell Phone Industry; References; 6 The Global Positioning System and the Average Person; Reference; 7 Spy Satellites and Military Communications; References; 8 Communications; Satellite Phones; Satellite lnternet; Network Television; Satellite Television; Broadcast Radio; Satellite Radio; Military Communications; References; 9 Weather Forecasting; Reference; 10 Remote Sensing: Environmental Monitoring and Science; Environmental Monitoring ; Pollution Monitoring
Energy ProductionResource Location; Agriculture; Satellite Archeology; References; 11 The International Space Station and Human Space Flight; References; 12 Effects on Scientific Research Satellites; Earth-Orbiting Spacecraft (at Risk from Orbital Debris, Solar Radiation, and War); Deep-Space Spacecraft (at Risk from Solar Radiation); References; Part 3 What Can We Do?; 13 Reduce the Growth in Orbital Debris; Deplete On-Board Energy Sources ; Limiting Post-Mission Orbital Lifetime to 25 Years; Limiting the Creation of New Debris; Limiting the Consequences of Impact with Orbital Debris
Limiting the Risk on the GroundReferences; 14 Reduce the Amount of Debris in Space; Large Debris Removal; Small Debris Removal; References; 15 Harden against Space Radiation (Contributed by Dr James K. Woosley); Reference; Appendices; A More on Orbital Debris; From the NASA Orbital Debris Quarterly News, Volume 16, Issue 4, October 2012; From the NASA Orbital Debris Quarterly News, Volume 16, Issue 3, July 2012; From the NASA Orbital Debris Quarterly News, Volume 16, lssue 2, April 2012 ; From NASA Orbital Debris Quarterly News, Volume 15, Issue 3, July 2011
From NASA Orbital Debris Quarterly News, Volume 15, Issue 1, January 2011From NASA Orbital Debris Quarterly News, Volume 15, Issue 1, January 2011; From NASA Orbital Debris Quarterly News, Volume 14, Issue 3, July 2010; From NASA Orbital Debris Quarterly News, Volume 14, Issue 2, April 2010 ; From NASA Orbital Debris Quarterly News, Volume 14, Issue 1, January 2010 ; From NASA Orbital Debris Quarterly News, Volume 13, Issue 1, January 2009; B The Kessler Effect as Originally Described; Collision Frequency of Artificial Satellites: The Creation of a Debris Belt; INTRODUCTION
SATELLITE ENVIRONMENT MODEL
Summary: ""Sky Alert! What Happens When Satellites Fail"" explores for the first time what our modern world would be like if we were suddenly to lose most, if not all, of our space assets. The author demonstrates humankind's dependence on space satellites and show what might happen to various aspects of our economy, defense, and daily lives if they were suddenly destroyed. The book opens with a consideration of how our space assets might be lost in the first place: through orbital debris, war, and solar storms. The author then looks at what would happen if our satellites were lost, including the effect
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TL795.3 .I66 2016 Dreams of other worlds : TL795.5 .H58 2014 Bold they rise : TL795.7 Human Migration to Space : TL796 -- .J64 2013eb Sky Alert! : TL796 .M28 2014 Satellite Technology : TL796.6.E2 L544 2014 Geostationary Satellites Collocation. TL796.6.M66.A78 2013 The ARTEMIS Mission.

Sky Alert!; Acknowledgment; About the Author; Contents; Chapter Summaries; Part 1: How We Might Lose Our Satellites; Part 2: If We Were to Lose Our Satellites...; Part 3: What Can We Do?; Introduction; References; Part 1 How We Might Lose Our Satellites; 1 Orbital Debris; References; 2 Space War; Nuclear Weapons; Electric Fire; Hackers; Space Rocks; Satellite Self-Detonation; References; 3 Solar Storms; References; Part 2 If We Were to Lose Our Satellites ...; 4 The Global Positioning System (Military Uses); Reference; 5 Economic Fallout; Very Small Aperture Terminals; Air Travel

The Next Generation Air Transportation System, or NextGenRail; Manufacturing; The Fishing Industry; Television; Satellite Radio; The Cell Phone Industry; References; 6 The Global Positioning System and the Average Person; Reference; 7 Spy Satellites and Military Communications; References; 8 Communications; Satellite Phones; Satellite lnternet; Network Television; Satellite Television; Broadcast Radio; Satellite Radio; Military Communications; References; 9 Weather Forecasting; Reference; 10 Remote Sensing: Environmental Monitoring and Science; Environmental Monitoring ; Pollution Monitoring

Energy ProductionResource Location; Agriculture; Satellite Archeology; References; 11 The International Space Station and Human Space Flight; References; 12 Effects on Scientific Research Satellites; Earth-Orbiting Spacecraft (at Risk from Orbital Debris, Solar Radiation, and War); Deep-Space Spacecraft (at Risk from Solar Radiation); References; Part 3 What Can We Do?; 13 Reduce the Growth in Orbital Debris; Deplete On-Board Energy Sources ; Limiting Post-Mission Orbital Lifetime to 25 Years; Limiting the Creation of New Debris; Limiting the Consequences of Impact with Orbital Debris

Limiting the Risk on the GroundReferences; 14 Reduce the Amount of Debris in Space; Large Debris Removal; Small Debris Removal; References; 15 Harden against Space Radiation (Contributed by Dr James K. Woosley); Reference; Appendices; A More on Orbital Debris; From the NASA Orbital Debris Quarterly News, Volume 16, Issue 4, October 2012; From the NASA Orbital Debris Quarterly News, Volume 16, Issue 3, July 2012; From the NASA Orbital Debris Quarterly News, Volume 16, lssue 2, April 2012 ; From NASA Orbital Debris Quarterly News, Volume 15, Issue 3, July 2011

From NASA Orbital Debris Quarterly News, Volume 15, Issue 1, January 2011From NASA Orbital Debris Quarterly News, Volume 15, Issue 1, January 2011; From NASA Orbital Debris Quarterly News, Volume 14, Issue 3, July 2010; From NASA Orbital Debris Quarterly News, Volume 14, Issue 2, April 2010 ; From NASA Orbital Debris Quarterly News, Volume 14, Issue 1, January 2010 ; From NASA Orbital Debris Quarterly News, Volume 13, Issue 1, January 2009; B The Kessler Effect as Originally Described; Collision Frequency of Artificial Satellites: The Creation of a Debris Belt; INTRODUCTION

SATELLITE ENVIRONMENT MODEL

""Sky Alert! What Happens When Satellites Fail"" explores for the first time what our modern world would be like if we were suddenly to lose most, if not all, of our space assets. The author demonstrates humankind's dependence on space satellites and show what might happen to various aspects of our economy, defense, and daily lives if they were suddenly destroyed. The book opens with a consideration of how our space assets might be lost in the first place: through orbital debris, war, and solar storms. The author then looks at what would happen if our satellites were lost, including the effect

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Les Johnson is the Deputy Manager for NASA's Advanced Concepts Office at the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. He is also the co-author of three published popular science books, Living Off the Land in Space (Springer/Copernicus 2007), the 2008 PROSE Award finalist, Solar Sails - A Novel Approach to Interplanetary Travel (Springer/Copernicus 2008), and Paradise Regained - The Regreening of Earth (Springer/Copernicus 2009). He is also the co-author of the science fiction novel, Back to the Moon (Baen/2010).

In the early 2000s, Les was NASA's Manager for Interstellar Propulsion Research and later managed the $100M In-Space Propulsion Technology Program. He has worked for NASA since 1990 and has served in various technical and management roles.

Les is the NASA co-investigator on the Japanese space tether experiment "T-Rex" that flew in late 2010. He was the Chief Scientist for the ProSEDS space experiment, twice received NASA's Exceptional Achievement Medal, and holds 3 space technology patents.

Les earned his Master's degree at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, TN and his Bachelor's Degree from Transylvania University in Lexington, KY. He has numerous peer-reviewed publications and was published in Analog. He is a frequent contributor to the Journal of the British Interplanetary Society and a member of the National Space Society, The World Future Society, and MENSA.

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