Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Aging Workers and the Employee-Employer Relationship.

By: Bal, P. Matthijs.
Contributor(s): Kooij, Dorien T.A.M | Rousseau, Denise M.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Cham : Springer International Publishing, 2014Description: 1 online resource (274 p.).ISBN: 9783319080079.Subject(s): Older people -- EmploymentGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Aging Workers and the Employee-Employer RelationshipDDC classification: 650 LOC classification: HD6279 -- .A35 2015Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Author Bios; Chapter 1: Introduction to Aging Workers and the Employee-Employer Relationship; 1.1 Introduction; References; Part I: The Role of Context and the Organization; Chapter 2: Older Workers, Stereotypes, and Discrimination in the Context of the Employment Relationship; 2.1 Age Bias in the Workplace: A Brief Review; 2.1.1 Age Bias at Work: The Components; 2.1.2 Stereotypes and Discrimination - Hand in Hand?; 2.1.3 What About Affect?; 2.1.4 Emerging Ideas in Age Bias at Work; 2.2 The Employment Relationship: A Context of Expectations and Perceptions
2.3 Age Bias and the Employment Relationship: Looking for Intersections2.3.1 Anticipatory Stage: Pre-entry; 2.3.2 Newcomer Socialization Stage; 2.3.3 Maintenance: Business as Usual; 2.3.4 Change: Shocks Sparked by Organization; 2.3.5 Change: Shocks Sparked by the Employee; 2.3.6 Disengagement; 2.4 Conclusions: Research to Do, Lessons to Learn; 2.4.1 Research Needs; 2.4.2 Practical Implications; 2.4.3 Concluding Thoughts; References; Chapter 3: Age Diversity and Age Climate in the Workplace; 3.1 Why Age Diversity Matters; 3.2 In a Nutshell: Theoretical Foundations of Age-Diversity Research
3.2.1 The Information/Decision-Making Perspective3.2.2 The Similarity-Attraction Paradigm and the Social Identity Approach; 3.2.3 Career Timetables and Prototype Matching; 3.2.4 Age-Based Faultlines; 3.3 Direct Effects of Age-Diversity in Organizational Settings; 3.3.1 Age Diversity and Performance; 3.3.2 Age Diversity and Innovation; 3.3.3 Age Diversity and Communication/Information Sharing; 3.3.4 Age Diversity and Emotion Regulation; 3.3.5 Age Diversity and Perceived Age Discrimination; 3.3.6 Age Diversity and Conflict; 3.3.7 Age Diversity and Health
3.3.8 Age Diversity and Turnover/Absenteeism3.3.9 Preliminary Summary; 3.4 Moderators of the Age Diversity-Outcome Relationship; 3.4.1 Demographic Characteristics; 3.4.2 Task Characteristics; 3.4.3 Team Processes; 3.4.4 Leadership Behavior; 3.4.5 Age Stereotypes; 3.4.6 HR and Diversity Management Practices; 3.5 Taking the Next Step: Age-Diversity Climate in the Workplace; 3.5.1 Diversity Mindsets and Climate for Diversity/Inclusion; 3.5.2 Age-Diversity Climate and Age Cultures; 3.6 Future Research Directions: Where Age-Diversity Research Might Go; References
Chapter 4: Strategic HRM for Older Workers4.1 Introduction; 4.2 What Happens When People Age?; 4.3 HR Practices for Older Workers and Its Effects; 4.4 The Role of Aging in Relations Between HRM, Motivation, Job Performance and Health; 4.5 Conclusions; References; Chapter 5: The Role of Line Managers in Motivation of Older Workers; 5.1 The General Role Line Managers Play in Human Resource Management ; 5.2 The Specific Role Line Managers Play in HRM Pertaining to Older Workers; 5.3 The Effects of Support for Older Workers on Motivation and Productivity
5.4 Factors Influencing Line Managers' Actions Towards Older Workers
Summary: This book focuses on the aging workforce from the employment relationship perspective. This innovative book specifically focuses on how organizations can ensure their aging workers remain motivated, productive and healthy. In 15 chapters, several experts on this topic describe how organizations through effective human resource management can ensure that workers are able to continue working at higher age. In addition, this book discusses the role older workers themselves play in continuing work at higher age. To do this, the authors integrate research from different areas, such as literature on
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HD6279 -- .A35 2015 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1965104 Available EBL1965104

Contents; Author Bios; Chapter 1: Introduction to Aging Workers and the Employee-Employer Relationship; 1.1 Introduction; References; Part I: The Role of Context and the Organization; Chapter 2: Older Workers, Stereotypes, and Discrimination in the Context of the Employment Relationship; 2.1 Age Bias in the Workplace: A Brief Review; 2.1.1 Age Bias at Work: The Components; 2.1.2 Stereotypes and Discrimination - Hand in Hand?; 2.1.3 What About Affect?; 2.1.4 Emerging Ideas in Age Bias at Work; 2.2 The Employment Relationship: A Context of Expectations and Perceptions

2.3 Age Bias and the Employment Relationship: Looking for Intersections2.3.1 Anticipatory Stage: Pre-entry; 2.3.2 Newcomer Socialization Stage; 2.3.3 Maintenance: Business as Usual; 2.3.4 Change: Shocks Sparked by Organization; 2.3.5 Change: Shocks Sparked by the Employee; 2.3.6 Disengagement; 2.4 Conclusions: Research to Do, Lessons to Learn; 2.4.1 Research Needs; 2.4.2 Practical Implications; 2.4.3 Concluding Thoughts; References; Chapter 3: Age Diversity and Age Climate in the Workplace; 3.1 Why Age Diversity Matters; 3.2 In a Nutshell: Theoretical Foundations of Age-Diversity Research

3.2.1 The Information/Decision-Making Perspective3.2.2 The Similarity-Attraction Paradigm and the Social Identity Approach; 3.2.3 Career Timetables and Prototype Matching; 3.2.4 Age-Based Faultlines; 3.3 Direct Effects of Age-Diversity in Organizational Settings; 3.3.1 Age Diversity and Performance; 3.3.2 Age Diversity and Innovation; 3.3.3 Age Diversity and Communication/Information Sharing; 3.3.4 Age Diversity and Emotion Regulation; 3.3.5 Age Diversity and Perceived Age Discrimination; 3.3.6 Age Diversity and Conflict; 3.3.7 Age Diversity and Health

3.3.8 Age Diversity and Turnover/Absenteeism3.3.9 Preliminary Summary; 3.4 Moderators of the Age Diversity-Outcome Relationship; 3.4.1 Demographic Characteristics; 3.4.2 Task Characteristics; 3.4.3 Team Processes; 3.4.4 Leadership Behavior; 3.4.5 Age Stereotypes; 3.4.6 HR and Diversity Management Practices; 3.5 Taking the Next Step: Age-Diversity Climate in the Workplace; 3.5.1 Diversity Mindsets and Climate for Diversity/Inclusion; 3.5.2 Age-Diversity Climate and Age Cultures; 3.6 Future Research Directions: Where Age-Diversity Research Might Go; References

Chapter 4: Strategic HRM for Older Workers4.1 Introduction; 4.2 What Happens When People Age?; 4.3 HR Practices for Older Workers and Its Effects; 4.4 The Role of Aging in Relations Between HRM, Motivation, Job Performance and Health; 4.5 Conclusions; References; Chapter 5: The Role of Line Managers in Motivation of Older Workers; 5.1 The General Role Line Managers Play in Human Resource Management ; 5.2 The Specific Role Line Managers Play in HRM Pertaining to Older Workers; 5.3 The Effects of Support for Older Workers on Motivation and Productivity

5.4 Factors Influencing Line Managers' Actions Towards Older Workers

This book focuses on the aging workforce from the employment relationship perspective. This innovative book specifically focuses on how organizations can ensure their aging workers remain motivated, productive and healthy. In 15 chapters, several experts on this topic describe how organizations through effective human resource management can ensure that workers are able to continue working at higher age. In addition, this book discusses the role older workers themselves play in continuing work at higher age. To do this, the authors integrate research from different areas, such as literature on

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> P. Matthijs Bal is Reader at the School of Management, University of Bath, United Kingdom. He obtained his PhD cum laude at VU University Amsterdam with research on psychological contracts of older workers. He worked at Erasmus University Rotterdam and VU University Amsterdam before he moved to Bath. His research interests concern the aging workforce, individualization of work arrangements, psychological contracts and the impact of fictional narratives in the workplace. He has published in a wide range of journals, including Journal of Management Studies , Journal of Vocational Behavior and PLOS One .</p> <p> Dorien Kooij is an assistant professor at the Department of Human Resource Studies of Tilburg University, the Netherlands. Her research focuses on aging at work and in particular on HR practices for older workers and on how work motivation changes with aging. She has published in international peer reviewed journals such as Journal of Organizational Behavior and Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology .</p> <p> Denise M. Rousseau is the H.J. Heinz II University Professor of Organizational Behavior and Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University's H. John Heinz III College and the Tepper School of Business. She is the faculty director of the Institute for Social Enterprise and Innovation and chair of Health Care Policy and Management program. She was previously on the faculty of Northwestern University's Kellogg School of Management, the University of Michigan's Department of Psychology and Institute for Social Research and the Naval Postgraduate School at Monterey. Rousseau's research focuses upon the impact workers have on the employment relationship and the firms that employ them. It informs critical concerns such as worker well-being and career development, organizational effectiveness, the management of change, firm ownership and governance and industrial relations.</p>

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.