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Politics, Markets and EU Gas Supply Security : Case Studies of the UK and Germany

By: Kopp, Sandu-Daniel.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Energiepolitik und Klimaschutz. Energy Policy and Climate Protection: Publisher: Wiesbaden : Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden, 2015Description: 1 online resource (324 p.).ISBN: 9783658083243.Subject(s): Energy policy -- Europe | Energy policy -- Germany | Gas industry -- Europe | Gas industry -- Germany | Natural gas -- Prices -- Europe | Petroleum industry and trade | Power resources -- EuropeGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Politics, Markets and EU Gas Supply Security : Case Studies of the UK and GermanyDDC classification: 621.042 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Foreword; Acknowledgements; Table of Contents; List of Figures; List of Tables; List of Important Abbreviations; 1. Introduction; 1.1 Macro-Trends in the Global and European Gas Markets ; 1.2 Research Design and Methodology; 1.2.1 Research Questions and Hypotheses; 1.2.2 State of the Art; 1.2.3 Conceptual Challenges and Research Gap; 1.2.4 Research Approach; 2. Theory and Methodology; 2.1 A Historical Approach to Energy Security; 2.2 Defining and Examining Energy Security: Methodological Challenges; 2.3 A Theoretical and Methodological Approach to Gas Security Analysis
2.3.1 The Traditional Gas Security Framework2.3.2 Compatibility With Current Energy Security Concepts; 2.3.3 Traditional and Liberalised Gas Markets: Theoretical Assumptions; 2.3.4 Measuring Energy Security: The Choice of Indicators; 3. EU Energy Legislation and Security of Gas Supply; 3.1 EU Energy Cooperation; 3.1.1 The European Coal and Steel Community and EURATOM; 3.1.2 The International Energy Agency; 3.1.3 From the Single European Market Act to the Treaty of Lisbon; 3.1.4 Green and White Papers towards a Common European Energy Policy; 3.1.5 The Climate and Energy Package
3.2 The Creation of a Common European Gas Market3.2.1 From the Gas Transit Directive to the Gas Regulation EC 1775/2005; 3.2.2 2005 DG COMP Energy Sector Inquiry; 3.2.3 Third Gas Directive (2009) and Regulation EC 715/2009; 3.2.4 The European Gas Target Model (GTM); 3.3 European Legislation and Gas Supply Security Provisions ; 3.3.1 The Third Energy Package and Security of Supply; 3.3.2 The Gas Security of Supply Directive 2004/67/EC; 3.3.3 The Gas Security of Supply Regulation 994/2010; 4. The UK Gas Market; 4.1 Market Structure and Competition; 4.1.1 Historical Development
4.1.2 Market Structure4.1.3 Competition; 4.2. Physical and Financial Gas Trading in the UK; 4.2.1 Historical Development; 4.2.2 The Uniform Network Code; 4.2.3 The NBP at the Forefront of European Traded Gas Markets; 4.2.4 Ways to the Market: Direct, OTC, Exchange; 4.3 Supply and Demand; 4.3.1 Gas Infrastructure (Import, Export, Storage) ; 4.3.2 The Role of Gas in the UK's Energy Mix ; 4.4 Gas Supply Security; 4.4.1 Official Assessments (2009-2010); 4.4.2 Resulting Policy Approaches (2011-2012) ; 4.4.3 What about Price Volatility?
4.5 The UK Gas Supply Security Framework: Summary and Conclusions4.5.1 R/P Ratio and Import/Source Dependency; 4.5.2 Long-Term Contracts and Investments; 4.5.3 Emergency Security Events; 5. The German Gas Market; 5.1 Market Structure and Competition; 5.1.1 Historical Development; 5.1.2 Market Structure; 5.1.3 Competition; 5.2 Gas Trading in Germany - Framework Conditions and Developments; 5.2.1 Negotiating a Model for Network Access in Germany; 5.2.2 The Cooperation Agreement II; 5.2.3 Reducing the Number of Market Areas: Opposition and Development
5.2.4 OTC Trading and Exchange-Based Trading in Germany
Summary: Sandu-Daniel Kopp investigates whether carbon reduction targets are compatible with market-driven competition in gas (and power) industries, and whether security of supply is compatible with competitive markets. He examines the policy trade-offs which need to be made between the three different elements, and whether these policy judgements should be economically or politically based. The analysis shows the need for a complex set of politically determined options to protect (competitive) markets from price risks and emergency events and demonstrates that this has thus far failed the policy test
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HD9581.E82 -- K67 2015eb (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1973960 Available EBL1973960

Foreword; Acknowledgements; Table of Contents; List of Figures; List of Tables; List of Important Abbreviations; 1. Introduction; 1.1 Macro-Trends in the Global and European Gas Markets ; 1.2 Research Design and Methodology; 1.2.1 Research Questions and Hypotheses; 1.2.2 State of the Art; 1.2.3 Conceptual Challenges and Research Gap; 1.2.4 Research Approach; 2. Theory and Methodology; 2.1 A Historical Approach to Energy Security; 2.2 Defining and Examining Energy Security: Methodological Challenges; 2.3 A Theoretical and Methodological Approach to Gas Security Analysis

2.3.1 The Traditional Gas Security Framework2.3.2 Compatibility With Current Energy Security Concepts; 2.3.3 Traditional and Liberalised Gas Markets: Theoretical Assumptions; 2.3.4 Measuring Energy Security: The Choice of Indicators; 3. EU Energy Legislation and Security of Gas Supply; 3.1 EU Energy Cooperation; 3.1.1 The European Coal and Steel Community and EURATOM; 3.1.2 The International Energy Agency; 3.1.3 From the Single European Market Act to the Treaty of Lisbon; 3.1.4 Green and White Papers towards a Common European Energy Policy; 3.1.5 The Climate and Energy Package

3.2 The Creation of a Common European Gas Market3.2.1 From the Gas Transit Directive to the Gas Regulation EC 1775/2005; 3.2.2 2005 DG COMP Energy Sector Inquiry; 3.2.3 Third Gas Directive (2009) and Regulation EC 715/2009; 3.2.4 The European Gas Target Model (GTM); 3.3 European Legislation and Gas Supply Security Provisions ; 3.3.1 The Third Energy Package and Security of Supply; 3.3.2 The Gas Security of Supply Directive 2004/67/EC; 3.3.3 The Gas Security of Supply Regulation 994/2010; 4. The UK Gas Market; 4.1 Market Structure and Competition; 4.1.1 Historical Development

4.1.2 Market Structure4.1.3 Competition; 4.2. Physical and Financial Gas Trading in the UK; 4.2.1 Historical Development; 4.2.2 The Uniform Network Code; 4.2.3 The NBP at the Forefront of European Traded Gas Markets; 4.2.4 Ways to the Market: Direct, OTC, Exchange; 4.3 Supply and Demand; 4.3.1 Gas Infrastructure (Import, Export, Storage) ; 4.3.2 The Role of Gas in the UK's Energy Mix ; 4.4 Gas Supply Security; 4.4.1 Official Assessments (2009-2010); 4.4.2 Resulting Policy Approaches (2011-2012) ; 4.4.3 What about Price Volatility?

4.5 The UK Gas Supply Security Framework: Summary and Conclusions4.5.1 R/P Ratio and Import/Source Dependency; 4.5.2 Long-Term Contracts and Investments; 4.5.3 Emergency Security Events; 5. The German Gas Market; 5.1 Market Structure and Competition; 5.1.1 Historical Development; 5.1.2 Market Structure; 5.1.3 Competition; 5.2 Gas Trading in Germany - Framework Conditions and Developments; 5.2.1 Negotiating a Model for Network Access in Germany; 5.2.2 The Cooperation Agreement II; 5.2.3 Reducing the Number of Market Areas: Opposition and Development

5.2.4 OTC Trading and Exchange-Based Trading in Germany

Sandu-Daniel Kopp investigates whether carbon reduction targets are compatible with market-driven competition in gas (and power) industries, and whether security of supply is compatible with competitive markets. He examines the policy trade-offs which need to be made between the three different elements, and whether these policy judgements should be economically or politically based. The analysis shows the need for a complex set of politically determined options to protect (competitive) markets from price risks and emergency events and demonstrates that this has thus far failed the policy test

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Sandu-Daniel Kopp has conducted research on energy politics and economics at the Berlin Centre for Caspian Region Studies, the European Centre for Energy and Resource Security at the King's College London, and the Oxford Institute for Energy Studies.

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