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Self and Relationships : Connecting Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Processes

By: Vohs, Kathleen D.
Contributor(s): Finkel, Eli J.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: New York : Guilford Publications, 2014Description: 1 online resource (448 p.).ISBN: 9781593855321.Subject(s): Interpersonal relations | Self -- Social aspects | SelfGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Self and Relationships : Connecting Intrapersonal and Interpersonal ProcessesDDC classification: 155.2 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; TOCContents; CH1. Introduction: Self and Relationships; Part 1 : Self --> Relationships; SECTION 1A Self- Regulation ; CH2. The Importance of Self-Regulation for Interpersonal Functioning; CH3. Pursuing Goals and Perceiving Others: A Self-Regulatory Perspective on Interpersonal Relationships; SECTION 1B: Self-Concept; CH4. Narcissism, Interpersonal Self-Regulation, and Romantic Relationships: An Agency Model Approach; CH5. Contingencies of Self-Worth and Self-Validation Goals: Implications for Close Relationships
CH6. The Inner and Outer Turmoil of Excessive Reassurance Seeking: From Self-Doubts to Social RejectionSECTION IC Interpersonal Schemas and Orientations; CH7. An Attachment Theory Perspective on the Interplay between Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Processes; CH8. Implicit Theories of Relationships and Coping in Romantic Relationships; CH9. Organization of Partner Knowledge: Implications for Liking and Loving, Longevity, and Change; CH10. From Altruism to Aggression: Understanding Social Interaction; Part II: Relationships --> Self; SECTION IIA Interdependence: Overarching Perspectives
CH11. A Functional, Evolutionary Analysis of the Impact of Interpersonal Events on Intrapersonal Self-ProcessesCH12. Rejection's Impact on Self-Defeating, Prosocial, Antisocial, and Self-Regulatory Behaviors; CH13. Does the Existence of Social Relationships Matter for Subjective Well-Being?; CH14. Cognitive Interdependence: Considering Self-in-Relationship; SECTION IIB Specific Social Interaction Processes; CH15. High-Maintenance Interaction and Self-Regulation; CH16. The Michelangelo Phenomenon: Partner Affirmation and Self- Movement toward One's Ideal
CH17. The Effect of Shared Participation in Novel and Challenging Activities on Experienced Relationship Quality: Is It Mediated by High Positive Affect?CH18. Self-Regulation in Interpersonal Relationships: The Case of Action versus State Orientation; SECTION IIC Interpersonal Cognitive Processes; CH19. When Your Wish Is My Desire: A Triangular Model of Self-Regulatory Relationships; CH20. Succeeding at Self-Control through a Focus on Others: The Roles of Social Practice and Accountability in Self-Regulation; IDXIndex
Summary: This volume brings together leading investigators who integrate two distinct research domains in social psychology--people's internal worlds and their close relationships. Contributors present compelling findings on the bidirectional interplay between internal processes, such as self-esteem and self-regulation, and relationship processes, such as how positively partners view each other, whether they are dependent on each other, and the level of excitement in the relationship. Methodological challenges inherent in studying these complex issues are described in depth, as are implications for und
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
BF697.5.S65 -- S45 2006eb (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=306788 Available EBL306788

Cover; TOCContents; CH1. Introduction: Self and Relationships; Part 1 : Self --> Relationships; SECTION 1A Self- Regulation ; CH2. The Importance of Self-Regulation for Interpersonal Functioning; CH3. Pursuing Goals and Perceiving Others: A Self-Regulatory Perspective on Interpersonal Relationships; SECTION 1B: Self-Concept; CH4. Narcissism, Interpersonal Self-Regulation, and Romantic Relationships: An Agency Model Approach; CH5. Contingencies of Self-Worth and Self-Validation Goals: Implications for Close Relationships

CH6. The Inner and Outer Turmoil of Excessive Reassurance Seeking: From Self-Doubts to Social RejectionSECTION IC Interpersonal Schemas and Orientations; CH7. An Attachment Theory Perspective on the Interplay between Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Processes; CH8. Implicit Theories of Relationships and Coping in Romantic Relationships; CH9. Organization of Partner Knowledge: Implications for Liking and Loving, Longevity, and Change; CH10. From Altruism to Aggression: Understanding Social Interaction; Part II: Relationships --> Self; SECTION IIA Interdependence: Overarching Perspectives

CH11. A Functional, Evolutionary Analysis of the Impact of Interpersonal Events on Intrapersonal Self-ProcessesCH12. Rejection's Impact on Self-Defeating, Prosocial, Antisocial, and Self-Regulatory Behaviors; CH13. Does the Existence of Social Relationships Matter for Subjective Well-Being?; CH14. Cognitive Interdependence: Considering Self-in-Relationship; SECTION IIB Specific Social Interaction Processes; CH15. High-Maintenance Interaction and Self-Regulation; CH16. The Michelangelo Phenomenon: Partner Affirmation and Self- Movement toward One's Ideal

CH17. The Effect of Shared Participation in Novel and Challenging Activities on Experienced Relationship Quality: Is It Mediated by High Positive Affect?CH18. Self-Regulation in Interpersonal Relationships: The Case of Action versus State Orientation; SECTION IIC Interpersonal Cognitive Processes; CH19. When Your Wish Is My Desire: A Triangular Model of Self-Regulatory Relationships; CH20. Succeeding at Self-Control through a Focus on Others: The Roles of Social Practice and Accountability in Self-Regulation; IDXIndex

This volume brings together leading investigators who integrate two distinct research domains in social psychology--people's internal worlds and their close relationships. Contributors present compelling findings on the bidirectional interplay between internal processes, such as self-esteem and self-regulation, and relationship processes, such as how positively partners view each other, whether they are dependent on each other, and the level of excitement in the relationship. Methodological challenges inherent in studying these complex issues are described in depth, as are implications for und

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

With this volume Vohs (Carlson School of Management, Univ. of Minnesota) and Finkel (Northwestern Univ.) do a great service to those interested in the study of self. The book's premise is simple and monumental: a need for a new subfield in social and personality psychology that is "located at the intersection of the self and relationships." The social and personality literature is full of work on interpersonal and intrapersonal processes, and the editors and their fellow contributors make a convincing case that the time has come for the two to meet. From the opening chapter (on the importance of self-regulation for interpersonal functioning) to the last chapter (on succeeding at self-control through a focus on others), the book illuminates the myriad ways that research on self and research on relationships mutually inform each other. The book creates the gestalt notion that more can be learned by the integration of these approaches than can ever be learned by studying one or the other in isolation. This "backward validation"--looking at self research as it informs understanding of relationships and at relationships research as it informs understanding of self--is thought-provoking and convincing. This volume will drive research for years to come. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. R. E. Osborne Texas State University--San Marcos

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Kathleen D. Vohs, PhD, is Associate Professor of Marketing at the Carlson School of Management at the University of Minnesota. She holds a McKnight Presidential Fellowship and is the Board of Overseers Professor of Marketing. Dr. Vohs has more than 120 professional publications, including six books. Her research is concerned with self-regulation, particularly in regard to impulsive spending and eating, decision making, self-esteem, the fear and feeling of being duped, self-escape behaviors, and the psychology of money. <br> <br> Eli J. Finkel, PhD, is Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology at Northwestern University. After receiving his PhD in social psychology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2001, Dr. Finkel served for 2 years as a postdoctoral fellow at Carnegie Mellon University under a grant from the National Institutes of Health. His research has examined the impact of self-processes (e.g., self-concept, self-regulatory dynamics, narcissistic entitlement) on relationships, and of relationship processes (e.g., interpersonal emotion expression, relationship commitment, social coordination) on the self. Dr. Finkel's most recent research focuses on the interplay between self and relationship dynamics in the first minutes, hours, and days of initial romantic attraction.

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