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Five Days in August : How World War II Became a Nuclear War

By: Gordin, Michael D.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2015Description: 1 online resource (231 p.).ISBN: 9781400874439.Subject(s): Atomic bomb -- United States -- History | Capitulations, Military -- Japan -- History -- 20th century | Hiroshima-shi (Japan) -- History -- Bombardment, 1945 | Nagasaki-shi (Japan) -- History -- Bombardment, 1945 | World War, 1939-1945 -- JapanGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Five Days in August : How World War II Became a Nuclear WarDDC classification: 940.54/2521954 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Title; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; List of Illustrations; Preface to the Paperback Edition; Acknowledgments; Chronology; CHAPTER 1: Endings; CHAPTER 2: Shock; CHAPTER 3: Special; CHAPTER 4: Miracle; CHAPTER 5: Papacy; CHAPTER 6: Revolution; CHAPTER 7: Beginnings; CODA: On the Scholarly Literature; Abbreviations Used in Notes; Notes; Index
Summary: Most Americans believe that the Second World War ended because the two atomic bombs dropped on Japan forced it to surrender. <i>Five Days in August</i> boldly presents a different interpretation: that the military did not clearly understand the atomic bomb's revolutionary strategic potential, that the Allies were almost as stunned by the surrender as the Japanese were by the attack, and that not only had experts planned and fully anticipated the need for a third bomb, they were skeptical about whether the atomic bomb would work at all. With these ideas, Michael Gordin reorients the historical
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
D767.25.H6 -- G67 2007eb (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=2089545 Available EBL2089545

Cover; Title; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; List of Illustrations; Preface to the Paperback Edition; Acknowledgments; Chronology; CHAPTER 1: Endings; CHAPTER 2: Shock; CHAPTER 3: Special; CHAPTER 4: Miracle; CHAPTER 5: Papacy; CHAPTER 6: Revolution; CHAPTER 7: Beginnings; CODA: On the Scholarly Literature; Abbreviations Used in Notes; Notes; Index

Most Americans believe that the Second World War ended because the two atomic bombs dropped on Japan forced it to surrender. <i>Five Days in August</i> boldly presents a different interpretation: that the military did not clearly understand the atomic bomb's revolutionary strategic potential, that the Allies were almost as stunned by the surrender as the Japanese were by the attack, and that not only had experts planned and fully anticipated the need for a third bomb, they were skeptical about whether the atomic bomb would work at all. With these ideas, Michael Gordin reorients the historical

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In this brief but impressive work, Gordin (history of science, Princeton) takes a fresh, unique look at a much-studied topic. Although he touches on the development of the atomic bomb, his main concern is how scientists, politicians, and military planners from the bomb's inception to the present have viewed this new weapon. Was it merely a dramatically more deadly device, or was it indeed a special weapon that changed life on the planet forever? Gordin's main focus is views of the bomb in the days just after the first two such weapons were dropped on Japan, but before Japan surrendered, with a special focus on the scientists assembling the weapons on Tinian. He convincingly argues that the idea that the bomb was so special that it led to a quick Japanese surrender developed in the weeks and years after the war. In those critical days before surrender, US political and military leaders were prepared to drop atomic bombs for months to come. Indeed, they saw the new weapon as a way to continue destruction as conventional bombing had done across Japan in 1945. Summing Up: Recommended. All levels/libraries. J. L. Gall Truman State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Michael D. Gordin is professor of the history of science at Princeton University. He is the author or editor of several books, including Red Cloud at Dawn: Truman, Stalin, and the End of the Atomic Monopoly .

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