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Global Governance on Renewable Energy : Contrasting the Ideas of the German and the Brazilian Governments

By: Roehrkasten, Sybille.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Wiesbaden : Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden, 2015Description: 1 online resource (306 p.).ISBN: 9783658104801.Subject(s): Renewable energy sources -- Law and legislation -- Brazil | Renewable energy sources -- Law and legislation -- Germany | Renewable energy sources -- Law and legislation | Renewable energy sourcesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Global Governance on Renewable Energy : Contrasting the Ideas of the German and the Brazilian GovernmentsDDC classification: 320 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Foreword; Preface and Acknowledgement; Contents; List of Tables; List of Figures; List of Abbreviations; 1 Introduction; 1.1 Research Purpose and Questions; 1.2 State of the Art; 1.3 Theoretical-Analytical Framework; 1.4 Methodological Approach; 1.5 Outline; 2 Theoretical-Analytical Framework: Contested Ideas in Global Governance; 2.1 Global Governance As a Perspective on Transboundary Policy-Making; 2.1.1 Contextualizing Global Governance Research; 2.1.2 Blurring the Boundaries between Domestic and Global Affairs; 2.1.3 Governments: Central, but not the Only Actors
2.1.4 Value Added of Transboundary Cooperation2.1.5 Transboundary Policy-Making in the Absence of a Supreme Authority; 2.2 Integrating Contested Ideas into Global Governance Research; 2.2.1 The Role of Ideas in Global Governance; 2.2.2 Contestation and Power in Global Governance; 2.2.3 Global Governors; 2.2.4 Global Governance as a Concept of the OECD World?; 2.3 Actor-Centered Framework for the Analysis of Global Governance Ideas; 2.3.1 Policy Actors as Drafters and Carriers of Ideas; 2.3.2 Weak Cognitivism and its Basic Behavioral Assumptions
2.3.3 Ideas as Causes and Results of Political Action2.3.4 Ideas on Global Renewable Energy Governance: Contents and Reasons Behind; 2.4 Methodology; 2.4.1 Interpretative Research Design; 2.4.2 Comparative Case Study Analysis; 2.4.3 Sources; 3 Global Governance on Renewable Energy; 3.1 Tracing the Origins and Evolution; 3.1.1 The Origins of Global Energy Governance; 3.1.2 Initial Attempts to Promote Renewable Energy; 3.1.3 Transboundary Policy-Making on Renewables Taking Shape; 3.2 Global Challenges Addressed by Renewable Energy Promotion; 3.2.1 Energy Security; 3.2.2 Access to Energy
3.2.3 Environmental Sustainability3.2.4 Trade-Offs Involved; 3.3 Structural Characteristics; 3.3.1 Dominance of National Policy-Making; 3.3.2 Fragmentation; 3.4 Global Governors and their Governance Activities; 3.4.1 IRENA; 3.4.2 IEA; 3.4.3 REEEP; 3.4.4 REN21; 3.4.5 GBEP; 3.4.6 CEM; 3.4.7 UN Bodies and Agencies; 3.4.8 G8 and G20; 3.5 A Snapshot at Contestation and Social Construction; 4 German Ideas on Global Renewable Energy Governance; 4.1 Tracing the Government's Action on Global Renewable Energy Governance ; 4.1.1 The Renewables 2004 Conference and the Establishment of REN21
4.1.2 Founding IRENA4.1.3 Launch of the Renewables Club; 4.2 Ideas on Global Renewable Energy Governance; 4.2.1 Global Challenges: Predominance of Climate Protection; 4.2.2 Renewable Energy Options: Sustainability and Electricity Markets; 4.2.3 Barriers: Markets and Policies Favoring Conventional Energy; 4.2.4 Tasks: Improving Domestic Regulatory Frameworks; 4.2.5 Global Governors: Providing Information and Advice on Renewable Energy; 4.2.6 Salient Features: the Responsibility of Industrialized Countries to Lead; 4.3 The German Government's Action and Ideas at a Glance
5 Brazilian Ideas on Global Renewable Energy Governance
Summary: Comparing Germany's and Brazil's government perspectives, Sybille Roehrkasten reveals that the ideas on global renewable energy governance are highly contested. In her study, the author sheds light on the politics behind the definition of global governance issues, focusing on two pioneers in the worldwide promotion of renewables and two decisive players in this emergent area of global cooperation. She demonstrates that ideas about problems and solutions in transboundary policy-making differ widely and that these differences are caused by the decision makers' policy contexts and self-interests.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
JA1-92 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=2094918 Available EBL2094918

Foreword; Preface and Acknowledgement; Contents; List of Tables; List of Figures; List of Abbreviations; 1 Introduction; 1.1 Research Purpose and Questions; 1.2 State of the Art; 1.3 Theoretical-Analytical Framework; 1.4 Methodological Approach; 1.5 Outline; 2 Theoretical-Analytical Framework: Contested Ideas in Global Governance; 2.1 Global Governance As a Perspective on Transboundary Policy-Making; 2.1.1 Contextualizing Global Governance Research; 2.1.2 Blurring the Boundaries between Domestic and Global Affairs; 2.1.3 Governments: Central, but not the Only Actors

2.1.4 Value Added of Transboundary Cooperation2.1.5 Transboundary Policy-Making in the Absence of a Supreme Authority; 2.2 Integrating Contested Ideas into Global Governance Research; 2.2.1 The Role of Ideas in Global Governance; 2.2.2 Contestation and Power in Global Governance; 2.2.3 Global Governors; 2.2.4 Global Governance as a Concept of the OECD World?; 2.3 Actor-Centered Framework for the Analysis of Global Governance Ideas; 2.3.1 Policy Actors as Drafters and Carriers of Ideas; 2.3.2 Weak Cognitivism and its Basic Behavioral Assumptions

2.3.3 Ideas as Causes and Results of Political Action2.3.4 Ideas on Global Renewable Energy Governance: Contents and Reasons Behind; 2.4 Methodology; 2.4.1 Interpretative Research Design; 2.4.2 Comparative Case Study Analysis; 2.4.3 Sources; 3 Global Governance on Renewable Energy; 3.1 Tracing the Origins and Evolution; 3.1.1 The Origins of Global Energy Governance; 3.1.2 Initial Attempts to Promote Renewable Energy; 3.1.3 Transboundary Policy-Making on Renewables Taking Shape; 3.2 Global Challenges Addressed by Renewable Energy Promotion; 3.2.1 Energy Security; 3.2.2 Access to Energy

3.2.3 Environmental Sustainability3.2.4 Trade-Offs Involved; 3.3 Structural Characteristics; 3.3.1 Dominance of National Policy-Making; 3.3.2 Fragmentation; 3.4 Global Governors and their Governance Activities; 3.4.1 IRENA; 3.4.2 IEA; 3.4.3 REEEP; 3.4.4 REN21; 3.4.5 GBEP; 3.4.6 CEM; 3.4.7 UN Bodies and Agencies; 3.4.8 G8 and G20; 3.5 A Snapshot at Contestation and Social Construction; 4 German Ideas on Global Renewable Energy Governance; 4.1 Tracing the Government's Action on Global Renewable Energy Governance ; 4.1.1 The Renewables 2004 Conference and the Establishment of REN21

4.1.2 Founding IRENA4.1.3 Launch of the Renewables Club; 4.2 Ideas on Global Renewable Energy Governance; 4.2.1 Global Challenges: Predominance of Climate Protection; 4.2.2 Renewable Energy Options: Sustainability and Electricity Markets; 4.2.3 Barriers: Markets and Policies Favoring Conventional Energy; 4.2.4 Tasks: Improving Domestic Regulatory Frameworks; 4.2.5 Global Governors: Providing Information and Advice on Renewable Energy; 4.2.6 Salient Features: the Responsibility of Industrialized Countries to Lead; 4.3 The German Government's Action and Ideas at a Glance

5 Brazilian Ideas on Global Renewable Energy Governance

Comparing Germany's and Brazil's government perspectives, Sybille Roehrkasten reveals that the ideas on global renewable energy governance are highly contested. In her study, the author sheds light on the politics behind the definition of global governance issues, focusing on two pioneers in the worldwide promotion of renewables and two decisive players in this emergent area of global cooperation. She demonstrates that ideas about problems and solutions in transboundary policy-making differ widely and that these differences are caused by the decision makers' policy contexts and self-interests.

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Dr. Sybille Roehrkasten is a researcher at the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) in Potsdam. She works on the international dimension of the energy transition.

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