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Byron and the Politics of Freedom and Terror.

By: Green, Matthew J. A.
Contributor(s): Pal-Lapinski, Piya.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011Description: 1 online resource (256 p.).ISBN: 9780230306608.Subject(s): Byron, George Gordon Byron, -- Baron, -- 1788-1824 -- Criticism and interpretation | Politics and literatureGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Byron and the Politics of Freedom and TerrorDDC classification: 810.9 | 821.7 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Contents -- List of Figures -- Acknowledgments -- Contributors -- Introduction: Byron and the Politics of Freedom and Terror -- 1 "That lifeless thing the living fear": Freedom, Community, and the Gothic Body in The Giaour -- 2 Sardanapalus, Spectacle, and the Empire State -- 3 Byron's Venetian Masque of the French Revolution: Sovereignty, Terror, and the Geopolitics of Marino Falieroand The Two Foscari -- 4 "Awake to Terror": The Impact of Italy on Byron's Depiction of Freedom's Battles -- 5 "Something Not Yet Made Good": Byron's Cain, Godwin, and Mary Shelley's Falkner
6 Manfred's New Promethean Agon -- 7 "Like the Sheeted Fire from Heaven": Transcendence and Resentment in Marino Faliero -- 8 "And Freedom's fame finds wings on every wind": Byron, Switzerland, and the Poetics of Freedom -- 9 Byron: Consistency, Change, and the Greek War -- 10 "I have a penchant for black": Race and Orphic Dismemberment in Byron's The Deformed Transformed and J. M. Coetzee's Disgrace -- 11 Byronic Terror and Impossible Exchange: From Werner to Baudrillard's The Spirit of Terrorism -- Notes -- Index
Summary: One can no longer speak of rights and freedoms without encountering the spectre of the 'terrorist', or without making allowances for a political existence which is excluded and/or excludes itself from the rule of law. Equally, however, the revolutionary conflicts of the late-eighteenth and early-nineteenth centuries have bequeathed a legacy that raises questions of responsibility, freedom and democracy that are central to political intervention and critique. Byron's texts, which themselves engage with the legacy of the Enlightenment as well as with the promise and the terror of the French Revolution, offer scholars insight into his problematic representations of freedom, his personal and financial support of Italian and Greek independence movements, his complicated response to Napoleon and his interest in Gothic literature (the literature of terror), all of which are highly topical within our own historical moment.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PR4392.P64 -- B97 2011eb (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=729833 Available EBL729833

Cover -- Contents -- List of Figures -- Acknowledgments -- Contributors -- Introduction: Byron and the Politics of Freedom and Terror -- 1 "That lifeless thing the living fear": Freedom, Community, and the Gothic Body in The Giaour -- 2 Sardanapalus, Spectacle, and the Empire State -- 3 Byron's Venetian Masque of the French Revolution: Sovereignty, Terror, and the Geopolitics of Marino Falieroand The Two Foscari -- 4 "Awake to Terror": The Impact of Italy on Byron's Depiction of Freedom's Battles -- 5 "Something Not Yet Made Good": Byron's Cain, Godwin, and Mary Shelley's Falkner

6 Manfred's New Promethean Agon -- 7 "Like the Sheeted Fire from Heaven": Transcendence and Resentment in Marino Faliero -- 8 "And Freedom's fame finds wings on every wind": Byron, Switzerland, and the Poetics of Freedom -- 9 Byron: Consistency, Change, and the Greek War -- 10 "I have a penchant for black": Race and Orphic Dismemberment in Byron's The Deformed Transformed and J. M. Coetzee's Disgrace -- 11 Byronic Terror and Impossible Exchange: From Werner to Baudrillard's The Spirit of Terrorism -- Notes -- Index

One can no longer speak of rights and freedoms without encountering the spectre of the 'terrorist', or without making allowances for a political existence which is excluded and/or excludes itself from the rule of law. Equally, however, the revolutionary conflicts of the late-eighteenth and early-nineteenth centuries have bequeathed a legacy that raises questions of responsibility, freedom and democracy that are central to political intervention and critique. Byron's texts, which themselves engage with the legacy of the Enlightenment as well as with the promise and the terror of the French Revolution, offer scholars insight into his problematic representations of freedom, his personal and financial support of Italian and Greek independence movements, his complicated response to Napoleon and his interest in Gothic literature (the literature of terror), all of which are highly topical within our own historical moment.

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

YOUNG-OK AN Associate Professor of English, University of St. Thomas, Minnesota, USASIMON BAINBRIDGE Professor of Romantic Studies, Lancaster University, UKIAN DENNIS Associate Professor in Romantics, University of Ottawa, CanadaJOSHUA DAVID GONSALVES Assistant Professor of English, American University of Beirut, LebanonJONATHAN GROSS Director of the Humanities Centre and Professor of English, DePaul University, USASTEPHEN MINTA Senior Lecturer in English and Comparative Literature, University of York, UKTILOTTAMA RAJAN Distinguished University Professor and Canada Research Chair in English and Theory, University of Western Ontario, Canada JANE STABLER Reader in Romantic Literature, School of English, University of St Andrews, UK ANDREW M. STAUFFER Associate Professor of English, University of Virginia, USA

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