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Gender and Genre : German Women Write the French Revolution

By: Hilger, Stephanie M.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Newark : University of Delaware Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (189 p.).ISBN: 9781611495300.Subject(s): France -- History -- Revolution, 1789-1799 -- Literature and the revolution | German literature -- Women authors -- History and criticismGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Gender and Genre : German Women Write the French RevolutionDDC classification: 830.9 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents -- Preface and Acknowledgments -- Introduction -- 1 Domestic Fiction, Bourgeois Tragedy, and Gothic Endings -- 2 Historical Fiction -- 3 Staging Historical Tragedy -- 4 Autobiographical Petition -- 5 Robinsonade as Encyclopedia -- 6 Bildungsroman of America -- Conclusion -- Works Cited -- Index -- About the Author
Summary: Gender and Genre explores the ways in which German women writers used literature, in the sense of belles lettres, to comment on the French Revolution and its aftermath. By doing so, these authors adapted major literary genres and questioned these genres' representation of women in the eighteenth- and nineteenth-century literary sphere.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PT167 -- .H54 2015eb (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1832666 Available EBL1832666

Contents -- Preface and Acknowledgments -- Introduction -- 1 Domestic Fiction, Bourgeois Tragedy, and Gothic Endings -- 2 Historical Fiction -- 3 Staging Historical Tragedy -- 4 Autobiographical Petition -- 5 Robinsonade as Encyclopedia -- 6 Bildungsroman of America -- Conclusion -- Works Cited -- Index -- About the Author

Gender and Genre explores the ways in which German women writers used literature, in the sense of belles lettres, to comment on the French Revolution and its aftermath. By doing so, these authors adapted major literary genres and questioned these genres' representation of women in the eighteenth- and nineteenth-century literary sphere.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Focusing on the period from 1795 to 1820, Hilger (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign) discusses novels by six women-Therese Huber, Caroline de la Motte Fouque, Christine Westphalen, Regula Engel, Sophie von la Roche, and Henriette Frolich. These women's works were trivialized by their contemporaries, including Goethe, or were difficult to obtain (they are now available in electronic form). Each of the novels Hilger discusses criticizes exclusionary Enlightenment thinking, failed ideals of fraternity from the French Revolution, and the lack of social welfare for widows or victims of war. In discussing Sophie von La Roche's Erscheinungen am see oneida (1798), a novel about noble émigrés living alone on an island in Lake Oneida (in upstate New York), Hilger reveals that European and Native American identities remain entirely stereotypical and hopelessly constricting. The prejudices of the society from which people wished to escape persist in a "new" world that fails to foster intellectual, social, or gender freedom. Hilger also discusses the form, structure, and narrative voices of these novels, their previous commentators, and further avenues for research. Supporting her argument with an extensive bibliography and notes, Hilger offers fruitful approaches to these and similar works, demonstrating how such criticism can help redefine the literary canon. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-division undergraduates and above. --Erlis Wickersham, Rosemont College

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