The hip hop wars : what we talk about when we talk about hip hop--and why it matters / Tricia Rose.

By: Rose, TriciaMaterial type: TextTextPublisher: New York : BasicCivitas, ©2008Description: xii, 308 pages ; 24 cmContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780465008971; 0465008976Other title: What we talk about when we talk about hip hop--and why it mattersSubject(s): Hip-hop -- Social aspects -- United States | Rap (Music) -- Social aspects -- United States | Social change -- United States | Subculture -- United States | African Americans -- Social conditions | United States -- Social conditionsAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Hip hop wars.; Online version:: Hip hop wars.DDC classification: 305.896/07301732 LOC classification: HN59.2 | .R68 2008Other classification: LS 48900 | LS 48650 Online resources: Table of contents | Table of contents | Inhaltsverzeichnis | Table of contents only
Contents:
Preface -- Introduction -- Part 1: Top Ten Debates In Hip Hop -- Hip hop's critics -- 1: Hip hop causes violence -- 2: Hip hop reflects black dysfunctional ghetto culture -- 3: Hip hop hurts black people -- 4: Hip hop is destroying America's values -- 5: Hip hop demeans women -- Hip hop's defenders -- 6: Just keeping it real -- 7: Hip hop is not responsible for sexism -- 8: There are bitches and hoes -- 9: We're not role models -- 10: Nobody talks about the positive in hip hop -- Part 2: Progressive Futures -- 11: Mutual denials in the hip hop wars -- 12: Progressive voices, energies, and visions -- 13: Six guiding principles for progressive creativity, consumption, and community in hip hop and beyond -- Appendix: Radio station consolidation -- Acknowledgments -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index.
Summary: From the Publisher: Hip-hop is in crisis. For the past dozen years, the most commercially successful hip-hop has become increasingly saturated with caricatures of black gangstas, thugs, pimps, and 'hos. The controversy surrounding hip-hop is worth attending to and examining with a critical eye because, as scholar and cultural critic Tricia Rose argues, hip-hop has become a primary means by which we talk about race in the United States. In The Hip-Hop Wars, Rose explores the most crucial issues underlying the polarized claims on each side of the debate: Does hip-hop cause violence, or merely reflect a violent ghetto culture? Is hip-hop sexist, or are its detractors simply anti-sex? Does the portrayal of black culture in hip-hop undermine black advancement? A potent exploration of a divisive and important subject, The Hip-Hop Wars concludes with a call for the regalvanization of the progressive and creative heart of hip-hop. What Rose calls for is not a sanitized vision of the form, but one that more accurately reflects a much richer space of culture, politics, anger, and yes, sex, than the current ubiquitous images in sound and video currently provide.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Fiction notes: Click to open in new window
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HN59.2 .R68 2008 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002106813

Includes bibliographical references (pages 289-291) and index.

Preface -- Introduction -- Part 1: Top Ten Debates In Hip Hop -- Hip hop's critics -- 1: Hip hop causes violence -- 2: Hip hop reflects black dysfunctional ghetto culture -- 3: Hip hop hurts black people -- 4: Hip hop is destroying America's values -- 5: Hip hop demeans women -- Hip hop's defenders -- 6: Just keeping it real -- 7: Hip hop is not responsible for sexism -- 8: There are bitches and hoes -- 9: We're not role models -- 10: Nobody talks about the positive in hip hop -- Part 2: Progressive Futures -- 11: Mutual denials in the hip hop wars -- 12: Progressive voices, energies, and visions -- 13: Six guiding principles for progressive creativity, consumption, and community in hip hop and beyond -- Appendix: Radio station consolidation -- Acknowledgments -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index.

From the Publisher: Hip-hop is in crisis. For the past dozen years, the most commercially successful hip-hop has become increasingly saturated with caricatures of black gangstas, thugs, pimps, and 'hos. The controversy surrounding hip-hop is worth attending to and examining with a critical eye because, as scholar and cultural critic Tricia Rose argues, hip-hop has become a primary means by which we talk about race in the United States. In The Hip-Hop Wars, Rose explores the most crucial issues underlying the polarized claims on each side of the debate: Does hip-hop cause violence, or merely reflect a violent ghetto culture? Is hip-hop sexist, or are its detractors simply anti-sex? Does the portrayal of black culture in hip-hop undermine black advancement? A potent exploration of a divisive and important subject, The Hip-Hop Wars concludes with a call for the regalvanization of the progressive and creative heart of hip-hop. What Rose calls for is not a sanitized vision of the form, but one that more accurately reflects a much richer space of culture, politics, anger, and yes, sex, than the current ubiquitous images in sound and video currently provide.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Renowned cultural critic Rose (Africana studies, Brown Univ.; Black Noise: Rap Music and Black Culture in Contemporary America) ventures again into the world of hip-hop and produces another work that should challenge common feelings about the subject. In the first section of the book, "Hip Hop's Critics," she disputes several long-standing arguments made by the detractors of the genre. Rose then changes tack completely in the second section, "Hip Hop's Defenders," arguing against several of the platitudes often voiced by those standing up for it. This balance adds to the credibility of the book, but it's Rose's convincing arguments and challenges of assumptions that make this an important title. She attempts to bring both sides together in the final section, but it's easy to imagine her cries falling on deaf ears. In fact, the biggest problem with the book is that its challenging stance and lecturing tone aren't likely to attract the number of readers on both sides of the argument who would most benefit from Rose's analyses. This title definitely deserves readers; recommended for all music and culture collections.-Craig Shufelt, Fort McMurray P.L., Alta. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Tricia Rose is a professor of Africana Studies at Brown University. She specializes in twentieth- and twenty-first-century African-American culture and politics, social thought, popular culture, and gender issues. The author of the seminal Black Noise, she lives in Providence, Rhode Island.

There are no comments on this title.

to post a comment.