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The Polythink Syndrome : U.S. Foreign Policy Decisions on 9/11, Afghanistan, Iraq, Iran, Syria, and ISIS

By: Mintz, Alex.
Contributor(s): Wayne, Carly.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Redwood City : Stanford University Press, 2016Description: 1 online resource (201 p.).ISBN: 9780804796774.Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Polythink Syndrome : U.S. Foreign Policy Decisions on 9/11, Afghanistan, Iraq, Iran, Syria, and ISISDDC classification: 327.73056 LOC classification: JZ1480Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Table of Contents -- Preface -- Acknowledgments -- Chapter 1 - The Polythink Syndrome -- Chapter 2 - Symptoms, Causes, and Consequences of Polythink -- Chapter 3 - The 9/11 Attacks: Polythink in National Security -- Chapter 4 - Polythink and Afghanistan War Decisions: War Initiation and Termination -- Chapter 5 - Decision Making in the Iraq War: From Groupthink to Polythink -- Chapter 6 - Polythink in the Iranian Nuclear Dispute: Decisions of the U.S. and Israel -- Chapter 7 - Recent Challenges: The Syria Debate, the Israeli-Palestinian Peace Negotiations, and the ISIS Decision
Chapter 8 - The Global Nature of Polythink and Its Productive Potential -- Notes -- References -- Index
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
JZ1480 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=4414748 Available EBL4414748

Table of Contents -- Preface -- Acknowledgments -- Chapter 1 - The Polythink Syndrome -- Chapter 2 - Symptoms, Causes, and Consequences of Polythink -- Chapter 3 - The 9/11 Attacks: Polythink in National Security -- Chapter 4 - Polythink and Afghanistan War Decisions: War Initiation and Termination -- Chapter 5 - Decision Making in the Iraq War: From Groupthink to Polythink -- Chapter 6 - Polythink in the Iranian Nuclear Dispute: Decisions of the U.S. and Israel -- Chapter 7 - Recent Challenges: The Syria Debate, the Israeli-Palestinian Peace Negotiations, and the ISIS Decision

Chapter 8 - The Global Nature of Polythink and Its Productive Potential -- Notes -- References -- Index

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The concept of groupthink has long been used by scholars of international relations to explain varieties of foreign policy decision making. As a psychological phenomenon, groupthink is supposed to affect the outcome of decisions by compelling decision makers to seek consensus and minimize conflict in a decision-making group. As such, groupthink forces decision makers to suppress evaluation of alternative or dissenting viewpoints and minimize creative and independent thought. In this well-researched, thought-provoking book, the authors introduce the concept of "polythink" as an alternative framework to explain why and how US presidents and their advisers made decisions on a host of foreign policy choices ranging from military intervention and escalation to termination of conflicts. Mintz (Institute for Policy and Strategy) and Wayne analyze 11 recent national security decisions--including US foreign policy decisions on 9/11, Iran, Iraq, Afghanistan, Syria, and ISIS--to demonstrate how and why "sub-optimal" decisions were reached in each case. They explain how the polythink syndrome created a group decision-making dynamic that led to divergent policy prescriptions resulting in decision paralysis or a disjointed decision-making process. The authors offer prescriptions for avoiding the pitfalls of polythink in future scenarios. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. --Nader Entessar, University of South Alabama

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Alex Mintz is Director of the Institute for Policy & Strategy (IPS) and Agam Professor at the Lauder School of Government, Interdisciplinary Center, Herzliya (IDC).Carly Wayne is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Michigan.

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