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The 4th revolution : how the infosphere is reshaping human reality / Luciano Floridi.

By: Floridi, Luciano, 1964- [author.].
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2014Edition: First edition.Description: xvi, 248 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780199606726; 0199606722; 9780191667695; 0191667692; 9780198743934; 0198743939.Other title: Fourth revolution.Subject(s): Information society | Internet -- Social aspects | Information technology -- Social aspects | Computers and civilizationDDC classification: 303.4833
Contents:
Time : hyperhistory -- Space : infosphere -- Identity: onlife -- Self-understanding : the four revolutions -- Privacy: informational friction -- Intelligence: inscribing the world -- Agency : enveloping the world -- Politics : the rise of the multi-agent systems -- Environment : the digital gambit -- Ethics : e-nvironmentalism.
Summary: "Floridi argues that we must expand our ecological and ethical approach to cover both natural and man-made realities, putting the 'e' in an environmentalism that can deal successfully with the new challenges posed by our digital technologies and information society."--Provided by publisher.Summary: "Is the informational world of smartphones and social media changing who we are and how we relate to others and the environment? Are we becoming informational organisms or 'inforgs', deeply enmeshed in a globe-spanning 'infosphere'? Luciano Floridi thinks so. In this exciting and provocative book, he considers the deeper implications of a future--almost upon us even now--in which we are always online, and the barriers between reality and the virtual world we inhabit when we switch on our computers finally dissolve. We are in the midst of a fourth revolution, he argues, as profound as those produced by Copernicus, Darwin, and Freud: a revolution set to change our sense of self, our relationships, society, politics, wars, and our management of the environment. We need to understand these changes and revise our ethics to reap the benefits and avoid the risks of this brave, new world."--Jacket.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HM851 .F592 2014 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002100170

Includes bibliographical references (pages 225-243) and index.

Time : hyperhistory -- Space : infosphere -- Identity: onlife -- Self-understanding : the four revolutions -- Privacy: informational friction -- Intelligence: inscribing the world -- Agency : enveloping the world -- Politics : the rise of the multi-agent systems -- Environment : the digital gambit -- Ethics : e-nvironmentalism.

"Floridi argues that we must expand our ecological and ethical approach to cover both natural and man-made realities, putting the 'e' in an environmentalism that can deal successfully with the new challenges posed by our digital technologies and information society."--Provided by publisher.

"Is the informational world of smartphones and social media changing who we are and how we relate to others and the environment? Are we becoming informational organisms or 'inforgs', deeply enmeshed in a globe-spanning 'infosphere'? Luciano Floridi thinks so. In this exciting and provocative book, he considers the deeper implications of a future--almost upon us even now--in which we are always online, and the barriers between reality and the virtual world we inhabit when we switch on our computers finally dissolve. We are in the midst of a fourth revolution, he argues, as profound as those produced by Copernicus, Darwin, and Freud: a revolution set to change our sense of self, our relationships, society, politics, wars, and our management of the environment. We need to understand these changes and revise our ethics to reap the benefits and avoid the risks of this brave, new world."--Jacket.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Floridi (philosophy & ethics of information, Oxford Univ.; The Ethics of Information) argues that advances in information and communication technologies (ICTs) are repositioning or removing the boundaries between "real" and online environments. ICTs are no longer mere tools of interaction but constitute the infosphere, the environment in which we live. The philosophical and ethical frameworks that are relevant in this new environment are explored, especially in the realms of how we think about time, place, the self, society, and the (physical) environment. This discussion requires a new language, which, as the author admits in the preface, is still being defined. As such, a proliferation of neologisms (e.g., hyperhistory, inforgs, onlife, etc.) necessitates the close attention of the reader to follow the largely abstract trains of thought. VERDICT Aforementioned difficulties aside, this text provides a wide-ranging overview of both new questions and new solutions to ethical problems that arise in the context of a society ever more dependent on information technology. It will appeal more to the philosopher and sociologist than to the techie interested in the newest gadgets or hardware and software advances.-Wade M. Lee, Univ. of Toledo Lib. (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Floridi (philosophy, Univ. of Hertfordshire, UK) explains the focus of his book in the preface: "This book is about how our digital ICTs (Information and Communication Technologies) are affecting our sense of self, how we relate to each other, and how we shape and interact with our world." By the author's definition, it is a philosophical, not technical or scholarly, treatise. The entire book rests on the idea of the previous three revolutions: Copernicus (1543) told us (humans) that we are not the center of the universe; Darwin (1859) taught us that we are not at the biological kingdom's center; and Freud (1917) showed us that we are not masters of our own mind in that much of what we do is unconscious. So what is left? Our thinking superiority? ICTs relieve us from mentally tiring work, but also potentially from our central role as the only smart agents in the "infosphere." This is the essence of the fourth revolution, and Turing is its father. The book's ten chapters (some previously published elsewhere) are titled "Time," "Space," "Identity," "Self-Understanding," "Privacy," "Intelligence," "Agency," "Politics," "Environment," and "Ethics." However, not all chapters blend cohesively into a single theme/message. Summing Up: Recommended. Philosophy and information technology collections serving upper-division undergraduates and above. --Haim Levkowitz, University of Massachusetts

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Luciano Floridi thinks so. In this exciting and provocative book, he considers the deeper implications of a future-almost upon us even now-in which we are always online, and the barriers between reality and the virtual world we inhabit when we switch on our computers finally dissolve. We are in the midst of a fourth revolution, he argues, as profound as those produced by Copernicus, Darwin, and Freud: a revolution set to change our sense of self, our relationships, society, politics, wars, and our management of the environment. We need to understand these changes and revise our ethics to reap the benefits and avoid the risks of this brave, new world.

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