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War Stories : Suffering and Sacrifice in the Civil War North

By: Clarke, Frances M.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2012Description: 1 online resource (267 p.).ISBN: 9780226108643.Subject(s): Sacrifice -- Social aspects -- Northeastern States -- History -- 19th century | Soldiers'' writings, American -- Northeastern States -- History -- 19th century | Suffering -- Social aspects -- Northeastern States -- History -- 19th century | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Personal narrativesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: War Stories : Suffering and Sacrifice in the Civil War NorthDDC classification: 973.7/8 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents -- List of Illustrations -- Acknowledgments -- Prologue -- 1. Suffering in Victorian America -- 2. Heroic Martyrs -- 3. Exceptional Sufferers -- 4. Labors of Love -- 5. Noble Monuments -- 6. Honorable Scars -- Epilogue -- Notes -- Index
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E601 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=3038364 Available EBL3038364

Contents -- List of Illustrations -- Acknowledgments -- Prologue -- 1. Suffering in Victorian America -- 2. Heroic Martyrs -- 3. Exceptional Sufferers -- 4. Labors of Love -- 5. Noble Monuments -- 6. Honorable Scars -- Epilogue -- Notes -- Index

Description based upon print version of record.

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CHOICE Review

Clarke (Univ. of Sydney, Australia) proves her worth as a compelling writer and meticulous researcher with this work set during and after the Civil War. She reveals how Union soldiers and veterans dealt with suffering and manhood and attempted to live up to the patriotic mythology of the wounded or fallen soldier. Families and friends of these victims of war often used "idealized tales of suffering and sympathy to cope with loss, define personal and national identity, achieve wartime unity, and give meaning to their experiences." It appears obvious that none wished to consider that a loved one had been wounded or died in vain; there had to be a purpose--a transcendental meaning--to the horror and bloodshed of the war for ordinary people who gave up sons, relatives, or husbands for the conflict. Particularly moving is Clarke's inclusion of Henry Bowditch's response upon learning of his son's death in battle. The father spent most of the remainder of his life proving to himself that his "martyred" son's death revealed the family's and son's patriotism; his son had died in a just cause. A companion to this excellent book is Drew Gilpin Faust's This Republic of Suffering (CH, Jan'09, 46-2859). Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. P. D. Travis Texas Woman's University

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