Organizing Disaster : The Construction of Humanitarianism

By: Rostis, AdamContributor(s): Mills, Albert JMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandCritical Management Studies: Publisher: Bingley : Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2016Description: 1 online resource (167 p.)ISBN: 9781785606847Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Organizing Disaster : The Construction of HumanitarianismDDC classification: 361.77 LOC classification: HB1-3840Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Front Cover -- Organizing Disaster -- Critical Management Studies -- Copyright page -- Contents -- Foreword -- Chapter 1 Introduction and Outline of the Book -- 1.1. Outline of the Book -- 1.2. Why Postcolonial Theory and Humanitarianism? -- 1.3. What Is the Intellectual Problem? -- 1.4. Decentering Common Sense: Genealogy as Method -- 1.5. Using Genealogy in Problematizing Humanitarianism -- 1.6. Theoretical Framework - Postcolonialism -- 1.7. Constraints -- 1.8. Outline of the Chapters -- Chapter 2 Methodology -- 2.1. Genealogy -- 2.2. What Is Genealogy?
2.3. The Theoretical Basis of Genealogy -- 2.4. Discourse -- 2.5. Genealogy as Methodology -- 2.6. The Practice of Genealogy -- 2.6.1. Historiography -- 2.6.2. Descent and Emergence -- 2.6.3. Problematization -- 2.7. Foucault's Archive and the Physical Archive -- 2.8. Conclusion -- Chapter 3 Problematizing Humanitarianism -- 3.1. Humanitarianism: Why Is it Problematic? -- 3.2. The Suffering Stranger -- 3.3. Religion and Humanitarianism -- 3.4. Humanitarianism and Colonialism -- 3.5. Humanitarianism and Suffering -- 3.6. Humanitarianism and Literature -- 3.7. Humanitarianism and the State
3.8. Humanitarianism and the Border -- 3.9. Philanthropy -- 3.10. Contemporary Humanitarianism -- 3.11. The Creation of the Humanitarian Organization -- 3.12. Conclusion -- Chapter 4 The Humanitarian Archive - The ICRC in Africa -- 4.1. Africa - The Cradle of Humanitarianism? -- 4.2. George Hoffmann - The ICRC's Man in Africa -- 4.3. Red Cross Operation -- 4.3.1. Red Cross Indoctrination -- 4.3.2. Intelligence Gathering -- 4.3.3. Swiss Influence -- 4.4. Colonial Attitudes -- 4.4.1. African Generalizations -- 4.4.2. Racial Stereotypes -- 4.4.3. Tribalism -- 4.4.4. Resistance -- 4.5. Eurocentrism
4.6. The Red Cross in Biafra -- 4.7. Nigeria - Independence and Conflict -- 4.8. Biafra and Humanitarianism -- 4.9. A Struggle for Control -- 4.9.1. The Nigerian Red Cross -- 4.9.2. The ICRC -- 4.9.3. Government of Nigeria/Citizens -- 4.10. Exceptional Circumstances -- 4.10.1. The ICRC -- 4.10.2. The Nigerian Red Cross -- 4.10.3. Government of Nigeria -- 4.11. Colonialism -- 4.11.1. The ICRC and the International Red Cross -- 4.11.2. Nigerian Red Cross -- 4.11.3. Government of Nigeria and the Victims of the Conflict -- 4.12. Emergence of Sans-frontièrism -- 4.13. Conclusion -- Chapter 5 MSF
5.1. MSF - Results from the Archive -- 5.2. Defining Humanitarianism in MSF: Simple … -- 5.3. … But Complex -- 5.4. MSF Critiques Humanitarianism -- 5.5. MSF Critiques Itself -- 5.6. Conclusion -- Chapter 6 Discussion -- 6.1. The Citizen Humanitarian -- 6.2. The Humanitarian Victim -- 6.3. The Humanitarian Professional -- 6.4. Humanitarian Organization as a Disciplinary Institution -- 6.5. Postcolonialism -- 6.5.1. Different Contexts, Yet Common Discourse -- 6.6. Resistance, Stakeholders, and Borders -- 6.7. Learning from Decolonization -- 6.8. Humanitarianism and Cosmopolitanism
Chapter 7 Conclusion
Summary: This book challenges the taken-for-granted status of organizations such as the Red Cross and Medecins Sans Frontieres by problematizing humanitarianism. It is a unique contribution to organization studies, re-reading humanitarianism to show that humanitarian organizations essentially serve as global disciplinary institutions.
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Front Cover -- Organizing Disaster -- Critical Management Studies -- Copyright page -- Contents -- Foreword -- Chapter 1 Introduction and Outline of the Book -- 1.1. Outline of the Book -- 1.2. Why Postcolonial Theory and Humanitarianism? -- 1.3. What Is the Intellectual Problem? -- 1.4. Decentering Common Sense: Genealogy as Method -- 1.5. Using Genealogy in Problematizing Humanitarianism -- 1.6. Theoretical Framework - Postcolonialism -- 1.7. Constraints -- 1.8. Outline of the Chapters -- Chapter 2 Methodology -- 2.1. Genealogy -- 2.2. What Is Genealogy?

2.3. The Theoretical Basis of Genealogy -- 2.4. Discourse -- 2.5. Genealogy as Methodology -- 2.6. The Practice of Genealogy -- 2.6.1. Historiography -- 2.6.2. Descent and Emergence -- 2.6.3. Problematization -- 2.7. Foucault's Archive and the Physical Archive -- 2.8. Conclusion -- Chapter 3 Problematizing Humanitarianism -- 3.1. Humanitarianism: Why Is it Problematic? -- 3.2. The Suffering Stranger -- 3.3. Religion and Humanitarianism -- 3.4. Humanitarianism and Colonialism -- 3.5. Humanitarianism and Suffering -- 3.6. Humanitarianism and Literature -- 3.7. Humanitarianism and the State

3.8. Humanitarianism and the Border -- 3.9. Philanthropy -- 3.10. Contemporary Humanitarianism -- 3.11. The Creation of the Humanitarian Organization -- 3.12. Conclusion -- Chapter 4 The Humanitarian Archive - The ICRC in Africa -- 4.1. Africa - The Cradle of Humanitarianism? -- 4.2. George Hoffmann - The ICRC's Man in Africa -- 4.3. Red Cross Operation -- 4.3.1. Red Cross Indoctrination -- 4.3.2. Intelligence Gathering -- 4.3.3. Swiss Influence -- 4.4. Colonial Attitudes -- 4.4.1. African Generalizations -- 4.4.2. Racial Stereotypes -- 4.4.3. Tribalism -- 4.4.4. Resistance -- 4.5. Eurocentrism

4.6. The Red Cross in Biafra -- 4.7. Nigeria - Independence and Conflict -- 4.8. Biafra and Humanitarianism -- 4.9. A Struggle for Control -- 4.9.1. The Nigerian Red Cross -- 4.9.2. The ICRC -- 4.9.3. Government of Nigeria/Citizens -- 4.10. Exceptional Circumstances -- 4.10.1. The ICRC -- 4.10.2. The Nigerian Red Cross -- 4.10.3. Government of Nigeria -- 4.11. Colonialism -- 4.11.1. The ICRC and the International Red Cross -- 4.11.2. Nigerian Red Cross -- 4.11.3. Government of Nigeria and the Victims of the Conflict -- 4.12. Emergence of Sans-frontièrism -- 4.13. Conclusion -- Chapter 5 MSF

5.1. MSF - Results from the Archive -- 5.2. Defining Humanitarianism in MSF: Simple … -- 5.3. … But Complex -- 5.4. MSF Critiques Humanitarianism -- 5.5. MSF Critiques Itself -- 5.6. Conclusion -- Chapter 6 Discussion -- 6.1. The Citizen Humanitarian -- 6.2. The Humanitarian Victim -- 6.3. The Humanitarian Professional -- 6.4. Humanitarian Organization as a Disciplinary Institution -- 6.5. Postcolonialism -- 6.5.1. Different Contexts, Yet Common Discourse -- 6.6. Resistance, Stakeholders, and Borders -- 6.7. Learning from Decolonization -- 6.8. Humanitarianism and Cosmopolitanism

Chapter 7 Conclusion

This book challenges the taken-for-granted status of organizations such as the Red Cross and Medecins Sans Frontieres by problematizing humanitarianism. It is a unique contribution to organization studies, re-reading humanitarianism to show that humanitarian organizations essentially serve as global disciplinary institutions.

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Adam Rostis, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada

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