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The second machine age : work, progress, and prosperity in a time of brilliant technologies / Erik Brynjolfsson, Andrew McAfee.

By: Brynjolfsson, Erik.
Contributor(s): McAfee, Andrew.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : W.W. Norton & Company, [2014]Edition: First edition.Description: 306 pages ; 25 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780393239355; 0393239357; 9780393350647; 0393350649.Subject(s): Information technology -- Economic aspects | Economic development -- Technological innovations | Progress -- Social aspects | Social stratificationDDC classification: 303.48/3 LOC classification: HC79.I55 | B796 2014Other classification: 50.12
Contents:
The big stories -- The skills of the new machines : technology races ahead -- Moore's law and the second half of the chessboard -- The digitization of just about everything -- Innovation : declining or recombining? -- Artificial and human intelligence in the second machine age -- Computing bounty -- Beyond GDP -- The spread -- The biggest winners : stars and superstars -- Implications of the bounty and the spread -- Learning to race with machines : recommendations for individuals -- Policy recommendations -- Long-term recommendations -- Technology and the future (which is very different from "technology is the future").
Summary: A revolution is under way. In recent years, Google's autonomous cars have logged thousands of miles on American highways and IBM's Watson trounced the best human Jeopardy! players. Digital technologies -- with hardware, software, and networks at their core -- will in the near future diagnose diseases more accurately than doctors can, apply enormous data sets to transform retailing, and accomplish many tasks once considered uniquely human. In The Second Machine Age MIT's Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee -- two thinkers at the forefront of their field -- reveal the forces driving the reinvention of our lives and our economy. As the full impact of digital technologies is felt, we will realize immense bounty in the form of dazzling personal technology, advanced infrastructure, and near-boundless access to the cultural items that enrich our lives. Amid this bounty will also be wrenching change. Professions of all kinds, from lawyers to truck drivers, will be forever upended. Companies will be forced to transform or die. Recent economic indicators reflect this shift: fewer people are working, and wages are falling even as productivity and profits soar. Drawing on years of research and up-to-the-minute trends, Brynjolfsson and McAfee identify the best strategies for survival and offer a new path to prosperity. These include revamping education so that it prepares people for the next economy instead of the last one, designing new collaborations that pair brute processing power with human ingenuity, and embracing policies that make sense in a radically transformed landscape. A fundamentally optimistic book, The Second Machine Age will alter how we think about issues of technological, societal, and economic progress. - Publisher.Summary: This book takes a look into the future of business, work, and the economy in a digital world. In recent years, computers have learned to diagnose diseases, drive cars, and win at Jeopardy!. Advances like these have created unprecedented economic bounty, but in their wake median income has stagnated and the share of the population with jobs has fallen. In this book the authors reveal the technological forces driving this reinvention of the economy and chart a path toward future prosperity. They describe how humans will have to keep pace with machines in order to become prosperous in the future and identify strategies and policies for business and individuals to use to combine digital processing power with human ingenuity. -- From book jacket.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HC79.I55 B796 2014 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002098093

Includes bibliographical references and index.

The big stories -- The skills of the new machines : technology races ahead -- Moore's law and the second half of the chessboard -- The digitization of just about everything -- Innovation : declining or recombining? -- Artificial and human intelligence in the second machine age -- Computing bounty -- Beyond GDP -- The spread -- The biggest winners : stars and superstars -- Implications of the bounty and the spread -- Learning to race with machines : recommendations for individuals -- Policy recommendations -- Long-term recommendations -- Technology and the future (which is very different from "technology is the future").

A revolution is under way. In recent years, Google's autonomous cars have logged thousands of miles on American highways and IBM's Watson trounced the best human Jeopardy! players. Digital technologies -- with hardware, software, and networks at their core -- will in the near future diagnose diseases more accurately than doctors can, apply enormous data sets to transform retailing, and accomplish many tasks once considered uniquely human. In The Second Machine Age MIT's Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee -- two thinkers at the forefront of their field -- reveal the forces driving the reinvention of our lives and our economy. As the full impact of digital technologies is felt, we will realize immense bounty in the form of dazzling personal technology, advanced infrastructure, and near-boundless access to the cultural items that enrich our lives. Amid this bounty will also be wrenching change. Professions of all kinds, from lawyers to truck drivers, will be forever upended. Companies will be forced to transform or die. Recent economic indicators reflect this shift: fewer people are working, and wages are falling even as productivity and profits soar. Drawing on years of research and up-to-the-minute trends, Brynjolfsson and McAfee identify the best strategies for survival and offer a new path to prosperity. These include revamping education so that it prepares people for the next economy instead of the last one, designing new collaborations that pair brute processing power with human ingenuity, and embracing policies that make sense in a radically transformed landscape. A fundamentally optimistic book, The Second Machine Age will alter how we think about issues of technological, societal, and economic progress. - Publisher.

This book takes a look into the future of business, work, and the economy in a digital world. In recent years, computers have learned to diagnose diseases, drive cars, and win at Jeopardy!. Advances like these have created unprecedented economic bounty, but in their wake median income has stagnated and the share of the population with jobs has fallen. In this book the authors reveal the technological forces driving this reinvention of the economy and chart a path toward future prosperity. They describe how humans will have to keep pace with machines in order to become prosperous in the future and identify strategies and policies for business and individuals to use to combine digital processing power with human ingenuity. -- From book jacket.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Contending that technology is forcing the economy, people, and employers to reinvent themselves, Brynjolfsson and McAfee (coauthors, Race Against the Machine) merge economics with technology, review technology's development (e.g., Google's autonomous cars), discuss the economic effects of technology on society, and offer survival strategies such as overhauling education, training, and social and economic policies for the future economy and pairing human integrity with computers' processing power. Jeff Cummings's nicely paced reading holds listeners' attention. Verdict An optimistic and thought-provoking title for the generalist interested in economics, business, and technology.-Laurie Selwyn, formerly with Grayson Cty. Law Lib., Sherman, TX (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

This book is essentially an elaborated version of the view of technological revolution presented in the authors' previous book, Race against the Machine (2011). Economist Richard Brinkman argued in Cultural Economics (1981) that culture is the store of knowledge and the source of exponentially advancing technological innovation and consequent economic growth. Brynjolfsson and McAfee (both, MIT) start with a similar premise and proceed to elaborate both the ways in which this rapid technological advance is manifested and its possible consequences. Whereas many economists have written pessimistically about the serious challenges to growing jobs in an environment in which automation is becoming more pervasive, these authors look forward to the opening up of new jobs and income opportunities that will generate continued healthy economic growth. They recognize that income inequality may arise from the transition, but they ultimately believe that Nixon-era solution, the negative income tax, could address this problem. This hopeful prognosis for a technologically advanced future will prove accessible to most any reader: the book is written in a wide-reaching style reminiscent of that of John Kenneth Galbraith or Paul Krugman. The authors' optimistic tone also recalls Marx's voice, persuasively arguing that technological advance may lead to a Utopian society. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-division undergraduates and above; general readers. --Satyananda J. Gabriel, Mount Holyoke College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Erik Brynjolfsson is the director of the MIT Center for Digital Business. He is the author of several books including Wired for Innovation: How Information Technology Is Reshaping the Economy and The Second Machine Age: Work, Progress, and Prosperity in a Time of Brilliant Technologies. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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