Understanding 19th-Century Slave Narratives.

By: Bland, SterlingMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandPublisher: Santa Barbara, CA : ABC-CLIO, 2016Description: 1 online resource (328 p.)ISBN: 9781440844645Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Understanding 19th-Century Slave NarrativesLOC classification: E444 | .B536 2016Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Preface -- Introduction: Bearing Witness: The Fugitive Slave Narrative and Its Traditions -- Stylistic Developments -- The Erasure of Origins -- Political Entrenchment and Increasing Ideological Discord -- Abolitionist Expansion and its Appropriation of the Ex-Slave's Voice -- Religion -- "What if I am a Woman?": Women, Religion, and the Antislavery Movement -- The Sameness of the Narratives -- The Reconstructive Voice -- The Literary Legacy of the Narratives -- Notes -- Chapter 1. Nat Turner (1800-1831) -- The Confessions of Nat Turner
Further Reading -- The Confessions of Nat Turner, The Leader of the Late Insurrection in Southampton, Va. (1831) -- District of Columbia, to wit -- To the Public -- Confession -- The Commonwealth, vs. Nat Turner -- A list of persons murdered in the Insurrection, on the 21st and 22nd of August, 1831 -- A List of Negroes Brought before the Court of Southampton, with Their Owners' Names, and Sentence. -- Notes -- Chapter 2. Lunsford Lane (1803-?) -- The Narrative of Lunsford Lane -- Further Reading -- The Narrative of Lunsford Lane, Formerly of Raleigh, N.C. (1842) -- Note to the Third Edition
To the Reader -- Narrative -- Notes -- Chapter 3. William Wells Brown (1814-1884) -- Narrative of William W. Brown, a Fugitive Slave -- Further Reading -- Narrative of William W. Brown, a Fugitive Slave, Written by Himself (1847) -- Note to the Second Edition -- Letter From Edmund Quincy, ESQ. -- Preface -- Chapter I -- Chapter II -- Chapter III -- Chapter IV -- Chapter V -- Chapter VI -- Chapter VII -- Chapter VIII -- Chapter IX -- Chapter X -- Chapter XI -- Notes -- Chapter 4. Henry "Box" Brown (1816-?) -- Narrative of Henry Box Brown -- Further Reading
Narrative of Henry Box Brown, Who Escaped from Slavery Enclosed in a Box 3 Feet Long and 2 Wide. Written from a Statement of Facts Made by Himself. With Remarks Upon the Remedy for Slavery by Charles Stearns (1849) -- Preface -- Hymn of Thanksgiving, Sung By Henry Box Brown, After Being Released From His Confinement in the Box, At Philadelphia. -- Narrative -- Cure for the Evil of Slavery -- Extract of an Address of Sam'l J. May, Unitarian Clergyman, in Syracuse, N.Y., Delivered in Faneuil Hall. -- Notes -- Chapter 5. James W. C. Pennington (1807-1870) -- The Fugitive Blacksmith
Further Reading -- The Fugitive Blacksmith -- or, Events in the History of James W. C. Pennington, Pastor of a Presbyterian Church, New York, Formerly a Slave in the State of Maryland, United States (1849) -- Preface -- Preface to Third Edition -- Chapter I -- My Birth and Parentage-The Treatment of Slaves Generally in Maryland. -- Chapter II -- The Flight -- Great Moral Dilemma -- Chapter III -- A Dreary Night in the Woods-Critical Situation the Next Day -- Chapter IV -- The Good Woman of the Toll-Gate Directs Me to W. W.-My Reception by Him -- Chapter V
Seven Months' Residence in the Family of J. K., a Member of the Society of Friends, in Chester County, Pennsylvania-Removal to New York-Becomes a Convert to Religion-Becomes a Teacher
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Cover -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Preface -- Introduction: Bearing Witness: The Fugitive Slave Narrative and Its Traditions -- Stylistic Developments -- The Erasure of Origins -- Political Entrenchment and Increasing Ideological Discord -- Abolitionist Expansion and its Appropriation of the Ex-Slave's Voice -- Religion -- "What if I am a Woman?": Women, Religion, and the Antislavery Movement -- The Sameness of the Narratives -- The Reconstructive Voice -- The Literary Legacy of the Narratives -- Notes -- Chapter 1. Nat Turner (1800-1831) -- The Confessions of Nat Turner

Further Reading -- The Confessions of Nat Turner, The Leader of the Late Insurrection in Southampton, Va. (1831) -- District of Columbia, to wit -- To the Public -- Confession -- The Commonwealth, vs. Nat Turner -- A list of persons murdered in the Insurrection, on the 21st and 22nd of August, 1831 -- A List of Negroes Brought before the Court of Southampton, with Their Owners' Names, and Sentence. -- Notes -- Chapter 2. Lunsford Lane (1803-?) -- The Narrative of Lunsford Lane -- Further Reading -- The Narrative of Lunsford Lane, Formerly of Raleigh, N.C. (1842) -- Note to the Third Edition

To the Reader -- Narrative -- Notes -- Chapter 3. William Wells Brown (1814-1884) -- Narrative of William W. Brown, a Fugitive Slave -- Further Reading -- Narrative of William W. Brown, a Fugitive Slave, Written by Himself (1847) -- Note to the Second Edition -- Letter From Edmund Quincy, ESQ. -- Preface -- Chapter I -- Chapter II -- Chapter III -- Chapter IV -- Chapter V -- Chapter VI -- Chapter VII -- Chapter VIII -- Chapter IX -- Chapter X -- Chapter XI -- Notes -- Chapter 4. Henry "Box" Brown (1816-?) -- Narrative of Henry Box Brown -- Further Reading

Narrative of Henry Box Brown, Who Escaped from Slavery Enclosed in a Box 3 Feet Long and 2 Wide. Written from a Statement of Facts Made by Himself. With Remarks Upon the Remedy for Slavery by Charles Stearns (1849) -- Preface -- Hymn of Thanksgiving, Sung By Henry Box Brown, After Being Released From His Confinement in the Box, At Philadelphia. -- Narrative -- Cure for the Evil of Slavery -- Extract of an Address of Sam'l J. May, Unitarian Clergyman, in Syracuse, N.Y., Delivered in Faneuil Hall. -- Notes -- Chapter 5. James W. C. Pennington (1807-1870) -- The Fugitive Blacksmith

Further Reading -- The Fugitive Blacksmith -- or, Events in the History of James W. C. Pennington, Pastor of a Presbyterian Church, New York, Formerly a Slave in the State of Maryland, United States (1849) -- Preface -- Preface to Third Edition -- Chapter I -- My Birth and Parentage-The Treatment of Slaves Generally in Maryland. -- Chapter II -- The Flight -- Great Moral Dilemma -- Chapter III -- A Dreary Night in the Woods-Critical Situation the Next Day -- Chapter IV -- The Good Woman of the Toll-Gate Directs Me to W. W.-My Reception by Him -- Chapter V

Seven Months' Residence in the Family of J. K., a Member of the Society of Friends, in Chester County, Pennsylvania-Removal to New York-Becomes a Convert to Religion-Becomes a Teacher

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Nineteenth-century slave narratives have long been used by historians as a resource for understanding slave life. In this work, Bland (English and African American studies, Rutgers) analyzes five narratives and The Confessions of Nat Turner from a literary rather than a historical perspective, examining how their style was influenced by factors such as religion, politics, and the needs of the abolition movement and then placing them in the context of the African American literary tradition. In particular, he explains why the ultimate purpose behind the narratives--the abolition of slavery--dictated a standard style and structure. While the narratives are powerful, there are problems with their treatment. For example, Bland's introduction to The Confessions discusses the absence of sustained slave revolts in the US and references Gabriel Prosser's 1800 revolt, but does not even mention the Louisiana Slave Revolt of 1811 or Denmark Vesey's conspiracy. Footnoting is sometimes oversimplistic. The author states that the main goal of the work is to make these narratives available to students and instructors in the classroom, and in that regard it should prove useful. Libraries wanting a literary analysis of the narratives should purchase this, but those looking for a broader historical framework need to look elsewhere. Summing Up: Recommended. All levels/libraries. --Don Butts, Gordon State College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Sterling Lecater Bland Jr. is associate professor of English and African American studies at Rutgers University.

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