Being bad : my baby brother and the school-to-prison pipeline / Crystal T. Laura ; foreword by William Ayers ; afterword by Erica R. Meiners.

By: Laura, Crystal TContributor(s): Ayers, William | Meiners, Erica RMaterial type: TextTextSeries: Teaching for social justice series: Publisher: New York : Teachers College Press ; 2014Description: xiv, 130 pages ; 23 cmContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780807755969; 0807755966; 9780807755976; 0807755974Subject(s): Chicago Public Schools | African American boys -- Education -- Social aspects | African American young men -- Education -- Social aspects | African American high school students -- Illinois -- Biography | School discipline -- United States | Juvenile justice, Administration of -- United StatesDDC classification: 371.829/96073 LOC classification: LC2779 | .L38 2014
Contents:
Foreword / William Ayers -- Preface -- 1. My Brother, Chris -- 2. School-to-Prison Pipeline -- 3. The Tipping Point -- 4. 21 Questions -- 5. Walk the Path -- Epilogue -- Afterword / Erica R. Meiners -- Appendix A: On the Methods and Ethics of Intimate Inquiry -- Appendix B: Resource List -- References -- Index -- About the Author.
Summary: "Being Bad will change the way you think about the social and academic worlds of Black boys. In a poignant and harrowing journey from systems of education to systems of criminal justice, the author follows her brother, Chris, who has been designated a "bad kid" by his school, a "person of interest" by the police, and a "gangster" by society. Readers first meet Chris in a Chicago jail, where he is being held in connection with a string of street robberies. We then learn about Chris through insiders' accounts that stretch across time to reveal key events preceding this tragic moment. Together, these stories explore such timely issues as the under-education of Black males, the place and importance of scapegoats in our culture, the on-the-ground reality of zero tolerance, the role of mainstream media in constructing Black masculinity, and the critical relationships between schools and prisons. No other book combines rigorous research, personal narrative, and compelling storytelling to examine the educational experiences of young Black males."--Publisher's description.
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Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
LC2779 .L38 2014 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002099786
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LC2731 .K57 2013 A search past silence : LC2741 .F35 2001 Teaching equality : LC2779 .K55 2013 College ready : LC2779 .L38 2014 Being bad : LC2782 .H34 2016 Cultivating racial and linguistic diversity in literacy teacher education : LC2802.S9 B874 2010 Schooling the freed people : LC3725 .N87 2018 Show, tell, build :

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Foreword / William Ayers -- Preface -- 1. My Brother, Chris -- 2. School-to-Prison Pipeline -- 3. The Tipping Point -- 4. 21 Questions -- 5. Walk the Path -- Epilogue -- Afterword / Erica R. Meiners -- Appendix A: On the Methods and Ethics of Intimate Inquiry -- Appendix B: Resource List -- References -- Index -- About the Author.

"Being Bad will change the way you think about the social and academic worlds of Black boys. In a poignant and harrowing journey from systems of education to systems of criminal justice, the author follows her brother, Chris, who has been designated a "bad kid" by his school, a "person of interest" by the police, and a "gangster" by society. Readers first meet Chris in a Chicago jail, where he is being held in connection with a string of street robberies. We then learn about Chris through insiders' accounts that stretch across time to reveal key events preceding this tragic moment. Together, these stories explore such timely issues as the under-education of Black males, the place and importance of scapegoats in our culture, the on-the-ground reality of zero tolerance, the role of mainstream media in constructing Black masculinity, and the critical relationships between schools and prisons. No other book combines rigorous research, personal narrative, and compelling storytelling to examine the educational experiences of young Black males."--Publisher's description.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Crystal T. Laura is an assistant professor of educational leadership at Chicago State University.

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