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Dataclysm : love, sex, race, and identity-- what our online lives tell us about our offline selves / Christian Rudder.

By: Rudder, Christian [author.].
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Broadway Books ; 2014Edition: First paperback edition.Description: 319 pages : illustrations (chiefly color), maps (chiefly color) ; 21 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780385347396; 0385347391.Other title: What our online lives tell us about our offline selves.Subject(s): Behavioral assessment | Human behavior | Social media | Big dataLOC classification: BF176.5 | .R83 2014b
Contents:
Part 1. What brings us together. Wooderson's Law -- Death by a thousand mehs -- Writing on the wall -- You gotta be the glue -- There's no success like failure -- Part 2. What pulls us apart. The confounding factor -- The beauty myth in apotheosis -- It's what's inside that counts -- Days of rage -- Part 3. What makes us who we are. Tall for an Asian -- Ever fallen in love? -- Know your place -- Our brand could be your life -- Breadcrumbs.
Summary: An irreverent, provocative, and visually fascinating look at what our online lives reveal about who we really are--and how this deluge of data will transform the science of human behavior. Big Data is used to spy on us, hire and fire us, and sell us things we don't need. In Dataclysm, Christian Rudder puts this flood of information to an entirely different use: understanding human nature. Drawing on terabytes of data from Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, OkCupid, and many other sites, Rudder examines the terrain of human experience. He charts the rise and fall of America's most reviled word through Google Search, examines the new dynamics of collaborative rage on Twitter, and traces human migration over time, showing how groups of people move from certain small towns to the same big cities across the globe. And he grapples with the challenge of maintaining privacy in a world where these explorations are possible. Audacious, entertaining, and illuminating, Dataclysm is a portrait of our essential selves--and a first look at a revolution in the making. --
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
BF176.5 .R83 2014b (Browse shelf) Available 0000002098986
Browsing University of Texas At Tyler Shelves , Shelving location: Stacks - 3rd Floor Close shelf browser
BF176 .T419 1984 V.2 Test critiques. BF176 .T43 1983 Tests : BF176 .T43 1983 SUPPL. Tests : BF176.5 .R83 2014b Dataclysm : BF178 .D62 1959 The Greeks and the irrational, BF181 .A3 The human subject; BF181 .A5 1972 Experimental psychology /

Originally published in hardcover by Crown Publishers with title: "Dataclysm : who we are when we think no one's looking."

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Part 1. What brings us together. Wooderson's Law -- Death by a thousand mehs -- Writing on the wall -- You gotta be the glue -- There's no success like failure -- Part 2. What pulls us apart. The confounding factor -- The beauty myth in apotheosis -- It's what's inside that counts -- Days of rage -- Part 3. What makes us who we are. Tall for an Asian -- Ever fallen in love? -- Know your place -- Our brand could be your life -- Breadcrumbs.

An irreverent, provocative, and visually fascinating look at what our online lives reveal about who we really are--and how this deluge of data will transform the science of human behavior. Big Data is used to spy on us, hire and fire us, and sell us things we don't need. In Dataclysm, Christian Rudder puts this flood of information to an entirely different use: understanding human nature. Drawing on terabytes of data from Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, OkCupid, and many other sites, Rudder examines the terrain of human experience. He charts the rise and fall of America's most reviled word through Google Search, examines the new dynamics of collaborative rage on Twitter, and traces human migration over time, showing how groups of people move from certain small towns to the same big cities across the globe. And he grapples with the challenge of maintaining privacy in a world where these explorations are possible. Audacious, entertaining, and illuminating, Dataclysm is a portrait of our essential selves--and a first look at a revolution in the making. --

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Rudder, cofounder of dating site OKCupid, offers an irreverent, thought-provoking popularization of data science, specifically online user data and what it tells us about attraction, division, and identity. Noting the dominant uses of data by corporations and government (marketing and surveillance), Rudder investigates and shares his enthusiasm for the human side of data. He mines his own site plus Twitter, Craigslist, Reddit, and Google among other sources to amass a huge data set and explain how this information can help us understand ourselves as humans. The author considers how changes in word frequency over time can signal cultural shifts, how racial and gender groups describe themselves using words not typically used by other groups, and how Twitter captures the immediate, authentic response to an event before reflection and media coverage interfere. VERDICT With a zest for both the profound and the wacky, Rudder demonstrates how the information we provide individually tells a vast deal about who we are collectively, from sex appeal to racial preferences on dating sites. A visually engaging read and a fascinating topic make this a great choice not just for followers of Nate Silver and fans of infographics, but for just about anyone who, by participating in online activity, has contributed to the data set.-Janet Ingraham Dwyer, State Lib. of Ohio, Columbus (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Christian Rudder is a co-founder and former president of the dating site OkCupid, where he authored the popular OkTrends blog. He graduated from Harvard in 1998 with a degree in math and later served as creative director for SparkNotes. He has appeared on Dateline NBC and NPR's "All Things Considered" and his work has been written about in the New York Times and the New Yorker, among other places. He lives in Brooklyn with his wife and daughter.

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