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Just business : multinational corporations and human rights / John Gerard Ruggie.

By: Ruggie, John Gerard, 1944-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Amnesty International global ethics series: Publisher: New York : W.W. Norton & Company, [2013]Edition: First edition.Description: l, 251 pages ; 22 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780393062885; 0393062880; 9780393937978; 0393937976.Subject(s): Business ethics | Human rights | International business enterprises -- Moral and ethical aspectsDDC classification: 174/.4 LOC classification: HF5387 | .R835 2013Other classification: 86.81
Contents:
Introduction : why business and human rights? -- The challenge -- No silver bullet -- Protect, respect and remedy -- Strategic paths -- Next steps.
Summary: One of the most vexing human rights issues of our time has been how to protect the rights of individuals and communities worldwide in an age of globalization and multinational business. Indeed, from Indonesian sweatshops to oil-based violence in Nigeria, the challenges of regulating harmful corporate practices in some of the world s most difficult regions long seemed insurmountable. Human rights groups and businesses were locked in a stalemate, unable to find common ground. In 2005, the United Nations appointed John Gerard Ruggie to the modest task of clarifying the main issues. Six years later, he had accomplished much more than that. Ruggie had developed his now-famous "Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights," which provided a road map for ensuring responsible global corporate practices. The principles were unanimously endorsed by the UN and embraced and implemented by other international bodies, businesses, governments, workers organizations, and human rights groups, keying a revolution in corporate social responsibility. Just Business tells the powerful story of how these landmark Ruggie Rules came to exist. Ruggie demonstrates how, to solve a seemingly unsolvable problem, he had to abandon many widespread and long-held understandings about the relationships between businesses, governments, rights, and law, and develop fresh ways of viewing the issues. He also takes us through the journey of assembling the right type of team, of witnessing the severity of the problem firsthand, and of pressing through the many obstacles such a daunting endeavor faced. Just Business is an illuminating inside look at one of the most important human rights developments of recent times. It is also an invaluable book for anyone wanting to learn how to navigate the tricky processes of global problem-solving and consensus-building and how to tackle big issues with ambition, pragmatism, perseverance, and creativity."--Publisher description.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HF5387 .R835 2013 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002102036

Includes bibliographical references (pages 203-225) and index.

Introduction : why business and human rights? -- The challenge -- No silver bullet -- Protect, respect and remedy -- Strategic paths -- Next steps.

One of the most vexing human rights issues of our time has been how to protect the rights of individuals and communities worldwide in an age of globalization and multinational business. Indeed, from Indonesian sweatshops to oil-based violence in Nigeria, the challenges of regulating harmful corporate practices in some of the world s most difficult regions long seemed insurmountable. Human rights groups and businesses were locked in a stalemate, unable to find common ground. In 2005, the United Nations appointed John Gerard Ruggie to the modest task of clarifying the main issues. Six years later, he had accomplished much more than that. Ruggie had developed his now-famous "Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights," which provided a road map for ensuring responsible global corporate practices. The principles were unanimously endorsed by the UN and embraced and implemented by other international bodies, businesses, governments, workers organizations, and human rights groups, keying a revolution in corporate social responsibility. Just Business tells the powerful story of how these landmark Ruggie Rules came to exist. Ruggie demonstrates how, to solve a seemingly unsolvable problem, he had to abandon many widespread and long-held understandings about the relationships between businesses, governments, rights, and law, and develop fresh ways of viewing the issues. He also takes us through the journey of assembling the right type of team, of witnessing the severity of the problem firsthand, and of pressing through the many obstacles such a daunting endeavor faced. Just Business is an illuminating inside look at one of the most important human rights developments of recent times. It is also an invaluable book for anyone wanting to learn how to navigate the tricky processes of global problem-solving and consensus-building and how to tackle big issues with ambition, pragmatism, perseverance, and creativity."--Publisher description.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The growth of economic activity in developing countries raises difficult problems of sustainability. Demand for business investment often leads to the exploitation of human and natural resources, and national governments typically lack the legal authority or political will to control development that has deleterious impacts on social interests. Ruggie (Harvard) is a leading figure in the movement to create business environments that include effective mechanisms of social justice. This book describes his accomplishments as the UN secretary-general's representative for business and human rights, a project that led to the widespread acceptance by 2011 of a framework and guiding principles for multinational corporations (MNCs). Ruggie's introductory chapter gives an overview of the major issues involved in the formation of policies for corporate social responsibility and discusses the limitations of international mandates. In subsequent chapters, Ruggie spells out a pragmatic approach based on guarantees of protection, respect, and redress to bridge the gap between legal rules and voluntary compliance on the part of MNCs. Ruggie's success at formulating and popularizing a normative foundation for corporate responsibility makes this book a basic text for anyone interested in global economic conditions and workers' rights. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduate through professional readership. R. L. Hogler Colorado State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

John Ruggie is the Berthold Beitz Professor in Human Rights and International Affairs at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University.

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