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Artificial crime analysis systems : using computer simulations and geographic information systems / Lin Liu, John Eck [editors].

Contributor(s): Liu, Lin, 1965- | Eck, John | IGI Global.
Material type: TextTextSeries: IGI Global Research Collection.Publisher: Hershey, Pa. : IGI Global (701 E. Chocolate Avenue, Hershey, Pennsylvania, 17033, USA), c2008Description: electronic texts (xxi, 485 p. : ill., maps) : digital files.ISBN: 9781599045931 (ebook); 1599045931 (ebook).Subject(s): Crime analysis -- Data processing | Criminology -- Computer network resources | Digital mapping | Information storage and retrieval systems -- Law enforcement | Geographic information systemsAdditional physical formats: No titleDDC classification: 364.0285 LOC classification: HV7936.C88 | A78 2008Online resources: Click here to view this ebook. Also available in print.
Contents:
Preface -- An overview of crime simulation / Lin Liu and John Eck -- Section I. The role of simulation in crime research -- Chapter I. The need for systematic replication and tests of validity in simulation / -- Michael Townsley and Shane Johnson -- Chapter II. Realistic spatial backcloth is not that important in agent based simulation research: an illustration from simulating perceptual deterrence / Henk Elffers and Pieter Van Baal -- Chapter III. Visualization of criminal activity in an urban population / Alex Breuer, Joshua J. Hursey, Tonya Stroman, and Arvind Verma -- Chapter IV. GIS-based simulation and visualization of urban landuse change / Md Mahbubur R. Meenar --
Section II. Streets, networks, and crime distribution -- Chapter V. Modelling pedestrian movement to measure on-street crime risk / -- Spencer Chainey and Jake Desyllas -- Chapter VI. Core models for state-of-the-art microscopic traffic simulation and key elements for applications / Heng Wei -- Chapter VII. Simulating urban dynamics using cellular automata / Xia Li -- Chapter VIII. Space-time measures of crime diffusion / Youngho Kim --
Section III. Crime event and pattern simulations -- Chapter IX. Synthesis over analysis: towards an ontology for volume crime simulation / Daniel J. Birks, Susan Donkin, and Melanie Wellsmith -- Chapter X. Offender mobility and crime pattern formation from first principles / P. Jeffrey Brantingham and George Tita -- Chapter XI. Crime simulation using GIS and artificial intelligent agents / Xuguang Wang, Lin Liu, and John Eck -- Chapter XII. Characterizing the spatio-temporal aspects of routine activities and the geographic distribution of street robbery / Elizabeth Groff -- Chapter XIII. Mastermind: computational modeling and simulation of spatiotemporal aspects of crime in urban environments / P.L. Brantingham, U. Glasser, P. Jackson, B. Kinney, and M. Vajihollahi -- Chapter XIV. The simulation of the journey to residential burglary / Karen L. Hayslett-McCall, Fang Qiu, Kevin M. Curtin, Bryan Chastain, Janis Schubert, and Virginia Carver -- Chapter XV. Simulating crime against properties using swarm intelligence and social networks / Vasco Furtado, Adriano Melo, Andre L.V. Coelho, Ronaldo Menezes, and Mairon Belchior -- Chapter XVI. FraudSim: simulating fraud in a public delivery program / Yushim Kim and Ningchuan Xiao --
Section IV. Criminal justice operation simulations -- Chapter XVII. Development of an intelligent patrol routing system using GIS and computer simulations / Joseph Szakas, Christian Trefftz, Raul Ramirez, and Eric Jefferis -- Chapter XVIII. Drug law enforcement in an agent-based model: simulating the disruption to street-level drug markets / Anne Dray, Lorraine Mazerolle, Pascal Perez, and Alison Ritter -- Chapter XIX. Using varieties of simulation modeling for criminal justice system analysis / Azadeh Alimadad, Peter Borwein, Patricia Brantingham, Paul Brantingham, Vahid Dabbaghian-Abdoly, Ron Ferguson, Ellen Fowler, Amir H. Ghaseminejad, Christopher Giles, Jenny Li, Nahanni Pollard, Alexander Rutherford, and Alexa van der Waall --
Section V. Conclusion -- Chapter XX. Varieties of artificial crime analysis: purpose, structure, and evidence in crime simulations / John Eck and Lin Liu -- Compilation of references -- About the contributors -- Index.
Abstract: "This book discusses leading research on the use of computer simulation of crime patterns to reveal hidden processes of urban crimes, taking an interdisciplinary approach by combining criminology, computer simulation, and geographic information systems into one comprehensive resource"--Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HV7936.C88 A78 2008 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://services.igi-global.com/resolvedoi/resolve.aspx?doi=10.4018/978-1-59904-591-7 Available ocn707612743

Includes bibliographical references (p. 433-466) and index.

Preface -- An overview of crime simulation / Lin Liu and John Eck -- Section I. The role of simulation in crime research -- Chapter I. The need for systematic replication and tests of validity in simulation / -- Michael Townsley and Shane Johnson -- Chapter II. Realistic spatial backcloth is not that important in agent based simulation research: an illustration from simulating perceptual deterrence / Henk Elffers and Pieter Van Baal -- Chapter III. Visualization of criminal activity in an urban population / Alex Breuer, Joshua J. Hursey, Tonya Stroman, and Arvind Verma -- Chapter IV. GIS-based simulation and visualization of urban landuse change / Md Mahbubur R. Meenar --

Section II. Streets, networks, and crime distribution -- Chapter V. Modelling pedestrian movement to measure on-street crime risk / -- Spencer Chainey and Jake Desyllas -- Chapter VI. Core models for state-of-the-art microscopic traffic simulation and key elements for applications / Heng Wei -- Chapter VII. Simulating urban dynamics using cellular automata / Xia Li -- Chapter VIII. Space-time measures of crime diffusion / Youngho Kim --

Section III. Crime event and pattern simulations -- Chapter IX. Synthesis over analysis: towards an ontology for volume crime simulation / Daniel J. Birks, Susan Donkin, and Melanie Wellsmith -- Chapter X. Offender mobility and crime pattern formation from first principles / P. Jeffrey Brantingham and George Tita -- Chapter XI. Crime simulation using GIS and artificial intelligent agents / Xuguang Wang, Lin Liu, and John Eck -- Chapter XII. Characterizing the spatio-temporal aspects of routine activities and the geographic distribution of street robbery / Elizabeth Groff -- Chapter XIII. Mastermind: computational modeling and simulation of spatiotemporal aspects of crime in urban environments / P.L. Brantingham, U. Glasser, P. Jackson, B. Kinney, and M. Vajihollahi -- Chapter XIV. The simulation of the journey to residential burglary / Karen L. Hayslett-McCall, Fang Qiu, Kevin M. Curtin, Bryan Chastain, Janis Schubert, and Virginia Carver -- Chapter XV. Simulating crime against properties using swarm intelligence and social networks / Vasco Furtado, Adriano Melo, Andre L.V. Coelho, Ronaldo Menezes, and Mairon Belchior -- Chapter XVI. FraudSim: simulating fraud in a public delivery program / Yushim Kim and Ningchuan Xiao --

Section IV. Criminal justice operation simulations -- Chapter XVII. Development of an intelligent patrol routing system using GIS and computer simulations / Joseph Szakas, Christian Trefftz, Raul Ramirez, and Eric Jefferis -- Chapter XVIII. Drug law enforcement in an agent-based model: simulating the disruption to street-level drug markets / Anne Dray, Lorraine Mazerolle, Pascal Perez, and Alison Ritter -- Chapter XIX. Using varieties of simulation modeling for criminal justice system analysis / Azadeh Alimadad, Peter Borwein, Patricia Brantingham, Paul Brantingham, Vahid Dabbaghian-Abdoly, Ron Ferguson, Ellen Fowler, Amir H. Ghaseminejad, Christopher Giles, Jenny Li, Nahanni Pollard, Alexander Rutherford, and Alexa van der Waall --

Section V. Conclusion -- Chapter XX. Varieties of artificial crime analysis: purpose, structure, and evidence in crime simulations / John Eck and Lin Liu -- Compilation of references -- About the contributors -- Index.

Restricted to subscribers or individual electronic text purchasers.

"This book discusses leading research on the use of computer simulation of crime patterns to reveal hidden processes of urban crimes, taking an interdisciplinary approach by combining criminology, computer simulation, and geographic information systems into one comprehensive resource"--Provided by publisher.

Also available in print.

Mode of access: World Wide Web.

Title from PDF t.p. (viewed on May 25, 2010).

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