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The Tourists Gaze, The Cretans Glance : Archaeology and Tourism on a Greek Island

By: Duke, Philip.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Heritage, Tourism & Community: Publisher: Walnut Creek : Taylor and Francis, 2016Description: 1 online resource (158 p.).ISBN: 9781598747799.Subject(s): Crete (Greece) -- Antiquities | Minoans | Tourism -- Greece -- CreteGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Tourists Gaze, The Cretans Glance : Archaeology and Tourism on a Greek IslandDDC classification: 939/.18 LOC classification: DF221.C8 -- D88 2007ebOnline resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
CONTENTS -- Preface -- Introduction -- CHAPTER ONE: Touring the Past -- CHAPTER TWO: The Minoan Past -- CHAPTER THREE: Tourists and the Constructed Past -- CHAPTER FOUR: Modern Crete, Ancient Minoans, and the Tourist Experience -- CHAPTER FIVE: Constructing a Prehistory -- CHAPTER SIX: The Nexus of the Past -- References Cited -- Index -- About the Author
Summary: As researchers bring their analytic skills to bear on contemporary archaeological tourism, they find that it is as much about the present as the past. Philip Duke's study of tourists gazing at the remains of Bronze Age Crete highlights this nexus between past and present, between exotic and mundane. Using personal diaries, ethnographic interviews, site guidebooks, and tourist brochures, Duke helps us understand the impact that archaeological sites, museums and the constructed past have on tourists' view of their own culture, how it legitimizes class inequality at home as well as on the is
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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DF221.C8 -- D88 2007eb (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=677804 Available EBL677804

CONTENTS -- Preface -- Introduction -- CHAPTER ONE: Touring the Past -- CHAPTER TWO: The Minoan Past -- CHAPTER THREE: Tourists and the Constructed Past -- CHAPTER FOUR: Modern Crete, Ancient Minoans, and the Tourist Experience -- CHAPTER FIVE: Constructing a Prehistory -- CHAPTER SIX: The Nexus of the Past -- References Cited -- Index -- About the Author

As researchers bring their analytic skills to bear on contemporary archaeological tourism, they find that it is as much about the present as the past. Philip Duke's study of tourists gazing at the remains of Bronze Age Crete highlights this nexus between past and present, between exotic and mundane. Using personal diaries, ethnographic interviews, site guidebooks, and tourist brochures, Duke helps us understand the impact that archaeological sites, museums and the constructed past have on tourists' view of their own culture, how it legitimizes class inequality at home as well as on the is

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This short book offers both professional and general readers a perspective that, while debated in archaeological circles, has received minimal attention in other venues. What some have termed the archaeology of the contemporary past is as much about the present as it is about antiquity. This is clearly the case with respect to indigenous societies and their claims to cultural ownership over long-buried artifacts and human remains. The specific example here, the Minoan civilization on the island of Crete, is particularly noteworthy because it has been made to carry such a significant social and cultural burden. From early in the last century, Bronze Age Crete has been defined as ancestral to Greek civilization, which in turn is commonly held to be the mainspring of Western culture. Duke (Fort Lewis College) interrogates the place of cultural tourism in contemporary society just as he examines the packaging of the past, whether for profit or for the purposes of consecrating national histories. In this topical and appealing book, he explores the wide range of political, cultural, and ethical issues that are at play in all archaeological endeavors. Summing Up: Recommended. All levels/libraries. O. Pi-Sunyer emeritus, University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Philip Duke is professor of anthropology at Fort Lewis College, Durango, Colorado, where he has taught since 1980. He is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries. Until recently, his professional work has been conducted on the archaeology of western North America, about which he has written Points in Time: Structure and Event in a Late Northern Plains Hunting Society. He is co-editor of Beyond Subsistence: Plains Archaeology and the Postprocessual Critique and of Archaeology and Capitalism: From Ethics to Politics . His research specialties include public archaeology and repatriation issues. He also works with the Ludlow Collective at the archaeological site of the 1914 Ludlow massacre near Trinidad, Colorado.

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