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Men at Work : The Working Man in British Culture, 1939-1945

By: Robb, Linsey.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Genders and Sexualities in History: Publisher: Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan, 2015Description: 1 online resource (178 p.).ISBN: 9781137527479.Subject(s): Masculinity -- Great Britain -- History -- 20th century | Men -- Employment -- Great Britain -- History -- 20th century | Men -- Great Britain -- Economic conditions -- 20th century | Work -- Social aspects -- Great Britain -- History -- 20th century | Working class -- Great Britain -- History -- 20th century | World War, 1939-1945 -- Economic aspects -- Great Britain | World War, 1939-1945 -- Social aspects -- Great BritainGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Men at Work : The Working Man in British Culture, 1939-1945DDC classification: 305.38/23094109044 LOC classification: D759 -- .R63 2015ebOnline resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Contents -- List of Figures -- Acknowledgements -- List of Abbreviations -- 1 Finding the Lost Working Man -- 2 Digging for Victory: Farming in Wartime Culture -- 3 The Attack Begins in the Factory: The Male Industrial Worker in Wartime Culture -- 4 Heroes on the Home Front: Firefighting in Wartime Culture -- 5 For Those in Peril on the Sea: The Merchant Navy in Wartime Culture -- 6 All in It Together?: Reflections on the Masculine Hierarchy -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index
Summary: Men at Work explores the cultural portrayal of four essential wartime occupations: agriculture, industry, firefighting and the mercantile marine. In analysing a broad spectrum of wartime media (most notably film, radio and visual culture) it establishes a clear hierarchy of masculine roles in British culture during the Second World War.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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D759 -- .R63 2015eb (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=4001364 Available EBL4001364

Cover -- Contents -- List of Figures -- Acknowledgements -- List of Abbreviations -- 1 Finding the Lost Working Man -- 2 Digging for Victory: Farming in Wartime Culture -- 3 The Attack Begins in the Factory: The Male Industrial Worker in Wartime Culture -- 4 Heroes on the Home Front: Firefighting in Wartime Culture -- 5 For Those in Peril on the Sea: The Merchant Navy in Wartime Culture -- 6 All in It Together?: Reflections on the Masculine Hierarchy -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index

Men at Work explores the cultural portrayal of four essential wartime occupations: agriculture, industry, firefighting and the mercantile marine. In analysing a broad spectrum of wartime media (most notably film, radio and visual culture) it establishes a clear hierarchy of masculine roles in British culture during the Second World War.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Working to fill a gap in the knowledge of men's experiences on the home front, historian Robb (Univ. of Strathclyde) explores how civilian men were portrayed to the British populace. Organizing her book by men's experiences, Robb focuses on four different occupations: farming, performing industrial labor, firefighting, and serving in the merchant navy. Certainly, the home front has been and continues to be understood as a feminized space in which women stepped into men's jobs. This book helps readers see that men were at home and providing important support for the war effort. Robb looks briefly at the men's own accounts of their experiences but focuses on how men's civilian labor was portrayed in propaganda and the media. This rich study, highly dependent on visual sources, demonstrates that a rather unsurprising hierarchy of labor remained attached to men's work. Men working in life-threatening jobs were valorized; men who engaged in farming and industrial labor were either not represented or represented as weaker individuals. Sadly, the book is limited in images that might have given strength to the analysis. Nevertheless, this is undoubtedly a useful contribution to the studies of masculinity and WW II. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. --Rebecca J. Bates, Berea College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Linsey Robb is a cultural and social historian based at the University of Strathclyde, UK. She has predominantly published on the representations, experiences and memories of civilian men during the Second World War.</p>

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