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Divergent Memories : Opinion Leaders and the Asia-Pacific War

By: Shin, Gi-Wook.
Contributor(s): Sneider, Daniel.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Studies of the Walter H. Shorenstein Asi: Publisher: Redwood City : Stanford University Press, 2016Description: 1 online resource (371 p.).ISBN: 9780804799720.Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Divergent Memories : Opinion Leaders and the Asia-Pacific WarDDC classification: 940.53/5 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents -- Acknowledgments -- 1. Introduction -- 1. Historical Memory, National Identity, and International Relations -- II. National Memories -- 2. Fashioning a Patriotic Narrative in Contemporary China -- 3. Confronting Collaboration in Korea -- 4. Multiple Memories of War in Postwar Japan -- 5. The Uncomfortable War: The Pacific War in American Memory -- III. Divided Memories: The Major Controversies -- 6. Japanese Colonial Rule, Forced Labor, and Comfort Women -- 7. The Sino-Japanese War and Japanese War Crimes -- 8. The War in the Pacific -- 9. The Atomic Bombings of Japan
10. The United States and Postwar Settlements -- IV. Conclusion -- 11. Toward Historical Reconciliation in the Asia-Pacific -- Appendix: Opinion Leaders Interviewed -- Notes -- Index
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
D767.S5556 2016 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=4661497 Available EBL4661497

Contents -- Acknowledgments -- 1. Introduction -- 1. Historical Memory, National Identity, and International Relations -- II. National Memories -- 2. Fashioning a Patriotic Narrative in Contemporary China -- 3. Confronting Collaboration in Korea -- 4. Multiple Memories of War in Postwar Japan -- 5. The Uncomfortable War: The Pacific War in American Memory -- III. Divided Memories: The Major Controversies -- 6. Japanese Colonial Rule, Forced Labor, and Comfort Women -- 7. The Sino-Japanese War and Japanese War Crimes -- 8. The War in the Pacific -- 9. The Atomic Bombings of Japan

10. The United States and Postwar Settlements -- IV. Conclusion -- 11. Toward Historical Reconciliation in the Asia-Pacific -- Appendix: Opinion Leaders Interviewed -- Notes -- Index

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

It is common knowledge that historical memories shape public thinking and policy making. The case of East Asia is a salient example. The publication of this book offers a fresh look into the troubling issues Koreans, Japanese, and Chinese have faced in dealing with their shared past. Basing their work on interviews with opinion leaders of each country, the authors (both, Stanford) present an in-depth investigation into the key differences that have so far divided these groups' memories of the past. The book also differs from other studies in that it includes the role the US played in East Asia from the postwar period to today. Besides the introduction and conclusion, the book consists of two major parts. One deals with the main characteristics of the national memories of the involved countries, and the other explores the major controversies over historical memory in the region. The latter includes war crimes and atrocities, comfort women, and the atomic bombings. While Shin and Sneider do not offer concrete solutions, their identification of the problems themselves is a great service for both scholarly communities and policy makers. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. --Q. Edward Wang, Rowan University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Gi-Wook Shin is the Tong Yang, Korea Foundation, Korea Stanford Alumni Chair of Korean Studies; Professor of Sociology; Director of the Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center; and Director of the Korea Program at Stanford University. Daniel Sneider is the Associate Director for Research of the Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center at Stanford University, and, with Gi-Wook Shin, is Co-Director of the Divided Memories and Reconciliation Project.

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