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George I. Sánchez : the long fight for Mexican American integration / Carlos Kevin Blanton.

By: Blanton, Carlos Kevin, 1970-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Lamar series in western history: Publisher: New Haven : Yale University Press, 2014Description: xv, 383 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780300190328; 0300190328.Subject(s): Sánchez, George Isidore, 1906-1972 | Mexican Americans -- Biography | Intellectuals -- United States -- Biography | Social reformers -- United States -- Biography | Political activists -- United States -- Biography | Educators -- Texas -- Biography | Mexican Americans -- Civil rights -- Southwest, New -- History -- 20th century | Mexican Americans -- Segregation -- Southwest, New -- History -- 20th century | Education, Bilingual -- Southwest, New -- History -- 20th century | Southwest, New -- Race relations -- History -- 20th centuryDDC classification: 970.92 | B Other classification: BIO002000 | HIS007000 | SOC044000
Contents:
Part I. 1906-1930s -- Early Life and Education, 1906-1930 -- New Mexico Schools and New Deal Politics, 1930-1935 -- Exile, Recognition, and Underemployment, 1935-1940 -- Part II. 1940s -- Sánchez's War of Ideas, 1940-1944 -- Sánchez's War of Activism, 1940-1944 -- Sánchez's War of Survival and His Transformations, 1944-1949 -- Part III. 1950s -- Politics and the Mexican American Generation -- Mexican Americans and the Immigration Issue -- Segregated Schools and Perceptions of Inequality -- Mexican American Racial Identity, Whiteness, and Civil Rights -- Part IV. 1960s-1972 -- Sánchez in Camelot and the Great Society, 1960-1967 -- Chicanismo and Old Age, 1967-1972 -- Epilogue.
Scope and content: "George I. Sánchez was a reformer, activist, and intellectual, and one of the most influential members of the 'Mexican American Generation' (1930-60). A professor of education at the University of Texas from the beginning of World War II until the early 1970s, Sánchez was an outspoken proponent of integration and assimilation. He spent his life combating racial prejudice while working with such organizations as the ACLU and LULAC in the fight to improve educational and political opportunities for Mexican Americans. Yet his fervor was not always appreciated by those for whom he advocated, and some of his more unpopular stands made him a polarizing figure within the Chicana/o community. Carlos Kevin Blanton has published the first biography of this complex man of notable contradictions. The author honors Sánchez's efforts, hitherto mostly unrecognized, in the struggle for equal opportunity, while not shying away from his subject's personal faults and foibles. The result is a long-overdue portrait of a towering figure in mid-twentieth-century America and the all-important cause to which he dedicated his life: Mexican American integration"-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E184.M5 B555 2014 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002102317

"George I. Sánchez was a reformer, activist, and intellectual, and one of the most influential members of the 'Mexican American Generation' (1930-60). A professor of education at the University of Texas from the beginning of World War II until the early 1970s, Sánchez was an outspoken proponent of integration and assimilation. He spent his life combating racial prejudice while working with such organizations as the ACLU and LULAC in the fight to improve educational and political opportunities for Mexican Americans. Yet his fervor was not always appreciated by those for whom he advocated, and some of his more unpopular stands made him a polarizing figure within the Chicana/o community. Carlos Kevin Blanton has published the first biography of this complex man of notable contradictions. The author honors Sánchez's efforts, hitherto mostly unrecognized, in the struggle for equal opportunity, while not shying away from his subject's personal faults and foibles. The result is a long-overdue portrait of a towering figure in mid-twentieth-century America and the all-important cause to which he dedicated his life: Mexican American integration"-- Provided by publisher.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 345-365) and index.

Part I. 1906-1930s -- Early Life and Education, 1906-1930 -- New Mexico Schools and New Deal Politics, 1930-1935 -- Exile, Recognition, and Underemployment, 1935-1940 -- Part II. 1940s -- Sánchez's War of Ideas, 1940-1944 -- Sánchez's War of Activism, 1940-1944 -- Sánchez's War of Survival and His Transformations, 1944-1949 -- Part III. 1950s -- Politics and the Mexican American Generation -- Mexican Americans and the Immigration Issue -- Segregated Schools and Perceptions of Inequality -- Mexican American Racial Identity, Whiteness, and Civil Rights -- Part IV. 1960s-1972 -- Sánchez in Camelot and the Great Society, 1960-1967 -- Chicanismo and Old Age, 1967-1972 -- Epilogue.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Blanton (Texas A&M Univ.) has written an admirable biography of George I. Sánchez (1906-72), the first comprehensive narrative of this important scholar activist. Sánchez earned an Ed. D. in 1934 from the Univ. of Texas, where he taught for decades. The author describes Sánchez as an integration purist who believed that Mexican Americans should participate in all aspects of society. Unfortunately, Sánchez and other activists of the Mexican American generation (1930-60) faced serious obstacles in Jim Crow Texas. Sánchez worked hardest to reform education, although his professional accomplishments frequently extended into the political area, too. He criticized educators' use of the cultural deprivation theory because, Blanton explains, it was used "as a rationalization for Mexican American segregation via 'special' education." Sánchez insisted on the integration of all students, even opposing bilingual education. Like others of his era, he believed in reforming society, not demanding radical changes. Blanton thoroughly describes Sánchez's remarkable career in great detail; for example, giving salary and divorce disputes, down to the penny. Secondary sources that Blanton references are not always listed in the bibliography. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. --Linda J. Quintanilla, Houston Community College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Carlos Kevin Blanton is associate professor of history at Texas A&M University.<br>

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