Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Conflicts of conscience in health care : an institutional compromise / by Holly Fernandez Lynch.

By: Lynch, Holly Fernandez.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Basic bioethics: Publisher: Cambridge, Mass. : MIT Press, ©2008Description: 1 online resource (xiv, 345 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780262278720; 0262278723; 9781435681446; 1435681444.Subject(s): Refusal to treat -- Moral and ethical aspects -- United States | Physician and patient -- Moral and ethical aspects -- United States | Physicians -- Professional ethics -- United States | Medical laws and legislation -- United States | Conscience -- United States | Medical ethics -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Conflicts of conscience in health care.DDC classification: 174.2 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
A primer on conscience clauses -- Defining medical professionalism -- Moral diversity in medicine and the ideal of doctor-patient matching -- Which institution?: licensing boards bearing the burdens of conscience and access -- Measuring patient demand and determining which demands to meet -- Measuring physician supply and limiting the grounds for physician refusal -- Calibrating supply and demand -- The "hard" cases: when the institutional solution fails -- Physician obligations and sacrifices -- Addressing skeptics, a model statute, and conclusions.
Summary: Holly Fernandez Lynch presents a balanced proposal that protects both a patient's access to care and a physician's ability to refuse to provide certain services for reasons of conscience.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
R727.36 .L96 2008 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt5hhf0c Available ocn283798183

Includes bibliographical references and index.

A primer on conscience clauses -- Defining medical professionalism -- Moral diversity in medicine and the ideal of doctor-patient matching -- Which institution?: licensing boards bearing the burdens of conscience and access -- Measuring patient demand and determining which demands to meet -- Measuring physician supply and limiting the grounds for physician refusal -- Calibrating supply and demand -- The "hard" cases: when the institutional solution fails -- Physician obligations and sacrifices -- Addressing skeptics, a model statute, and conclusions.

Print version record.

Holly Fernandez Lynch presents a balanced proposal that protects both a patient's access to care and a physician's ability to refuse to provide certain services for reasons of conscience.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This brilliant book examines the ethical and practical limits of "conscience clauses" that allow physicians the right to refuse to perform procedures they find morally objectionable. Lynch (attorney, Washington, DC) argues that this right must be balanced with a patient's right to access legal medical procedures that are in their best interests. She also argues that the US needs a sensible system that notifies patients of physicians' ethical values while allowing physicians to maintain the moral integrity that refusal permits. Lynch's discussion of the challenges and necessities of physician morality and patients' rights of access is nuanced and careful, probing contemporary writing on medical professionalism and the morality and social obligations of physicians. She draws judiciously on other forms of law that might set relevant legal precedents for determining how to balance physicians' rights and patients' access needs. Then she turns to a proposal that seeks to balance physicians' rights of refusal and patients' rights of access. Although this proposal may be difficult to implement, Lynch's analysis of the legal, political, and ethical implications of conscience clauses is first-rate. This book is interdisciplinary bioethics at its finest. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-level undergraduates and above. A. W. Klink Duke University

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.