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Haunting the Korean diaspora : shame, secrecy, and the forgotten war / Grace M. Cho.

By: Cho, Grace M [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, ©2008Description: 1 online resource (xiii, 245 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780816666461; 0816666466.Subject(s): Korean Americans -- Psychology | Korean American women -- Psychology | Immigrants -- United States -- Psychology | Psychic trauma -- Korea (South) | Shame -- United States | Secrecy -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Haunting the Korean diaspora.DDC classification: 951.904/2082 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Fleshing out the ghost -- A genealogy of trauma -- Tracing the disappearance of the Yanggongju -- The fantasy of honorary whiteness -- Diasporic vision: methods of seeing trauma.
Summary: Since the Korean War--the forgotten war--more than a million Korean women have acted as sex workers for U.S. servicemen. More than 100,000 women married GIs and moved to the United States. Through intellectual vigor and personal recollection, Haunting the Korean Diaspora explores the repressed history of emotional and physical violence between the United States and Korea and the unexamined reverberations of sexual relationships between Korean women and American soldiers. Grace M. Cho exposes how Koreans in the United States have been profoundly affected by the forgotten war and uncovers the silences and secrets that still surround it, arguing that trauma memories have been passed unconsciously through a process psychoanalysts call "transgenerational haunting". Tracing how such secrets have turned into "ghosts," Cho investigates the mythic figure of the yanggongju, literally the "Western princess," who provides sexual favors to American military personnel. She reveals how this figure haunts both the intimate realm of memory and public discourse, in which narratives of U.S. benevolence abroad and assimilation of immigrants at home go unchallenged. Memories of U.S. violence, Cho writes, threaten to undo these narratives--and so they have been rendered unspeakable.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E184.K6 C473 2008 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.ctttsnfm Available ocn311053574
Browsing UT Tyler Online Shelves , Shelving location: Online Close shelf browser
E184.J5 H345 2009 Gender and American Jews : E184.J5 M74 2011 And the Bridge Is Love. E184.K45 S35 2012 War, genocide, and justice : E184.K6 C473 2008 Haunting the Korean diaspora : E184.K6 P35 2006eb Korean American Women : E184.K6 Y756 2014 Caring across generations : E184.K6 Y845 2002 Beyond the shadow of Camptown :

Fleshing out the ghost -- A genealogy of trauma -- Tracing the disappearance of the Yanggongju -- The fantasy of honorary whiteness -- Diasporic vision: methods of seeing trauma.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 203-235) and index.

Since the Korean War--the forgotten war--more than a million Korean women have acted as sex workers for U.S. servicemen. More than 100,000 women married GIs and moved to the United States. Through intellectual vigor and personal recollection, Haunting the Korean Diaspora explores the repressed history of emotional and physical violence between the United States and Korea and the unexamined reverberations of sexual relationships between Korean women and American soldiers. Grace M. Cho exposes how Koreans in the United States have been profoundly affected by the forgotten war and uncovers the silences and secrets that still surround it, arguing that trauma memories have been passed unconsciously through a process psychoanalysts call "transgenerational haunting". Tracing how such secrets have turned into "ghosts," Cho investigates the mythic figure of the yanggongju, literally the "Western princess," who provides sexual favors to American military personnel. She reveals how this figure haunts both the intimate realm of memory and public discourse, in which narratives of U.S. benevolence abroad and assimilation of immigrants at home go unchallenged. Memories of U.S. violence, Cho writes, threaten to undo these narratives--and so they have been rendered unspeakable.

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