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Alice in Jamesland : the story of Alice Howe Gibbens James / Susan E. Gunter.

By: Gunter, Susan E, 1947-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, ©2009Description: 1 online resource (xvii, 422 pages, [20] pages of plates) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780803222755; 0803222750.Subject(s): Sisters-in-law -- United States -- Biography | Spouses -- United States -- Biography | Women -- United States -- BiographyAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Alice in Jamesland.DDC classification: 973.8092 | B Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Stirrings -- New ventures -- He loves me, he loves me not -- Alice in Jamesland -- The grief child -- New directions -- 95 Irving Street and beyond -- On sabbatical -- The will to endure -- To bad Nauheim -- Mendings -- A form of use -- The lull before the storm -- Summer's end -- Last things -- The philosopher's widow -- Passages -- Living option.
Summary: Alice in Jamesland, the first biography of Alice Howe Gibbens James?wife of the psychologist and philosopher William James, and sister-in-law of novelist Henry James?was made possible by the rediscovery of hundreds of her letters and papers thought to be destroyed in the 1960s. Encompassing European travel, Civil War profiteering, suicide, a stormy courtship, séances, psychedelic mushrooms, the death of a child, and an enduring love story, Alice in Jamesland is a portrait of a nineteenth-century upper-middle-class marriage, told often through Alice?s own letters and made all the more dynamic b.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
CT275.J2915 G86 2009 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt1dfntzs Available ocn316764800

Includes bibliographical references (pages 333-405) and index.

Print version record.

Alice in Jamesland, the first biography of Alice Howe Gibbens James?wife of the psychologist and philosopher William James, and sister-in-law of novelist Henry James?was made possible by the rediscovery of hundreds of her letters and papers thought to be destroyed in the 1960s. Encompassing European travel, Civil War profiteering, suicide, a stormy courtship, séances, psychedelic mushrooms, the death of a child, and an enduring love story, Alice in Jamesland is a portrait of a nineteenth-century upper-middle-class marriage, told often through Alice?s own letters and made all the more dynamic b.

Stirrings -- New ventures -- He loves me, he loves me not -- Alice in Jamesland -- The grief child -- New directions -- 95 Irving Street and beyond -- On sabbatical -- The will to endure -- To bad Nauheim -- Mendings -- A form of use -- The lull before the storm -- Summer's end -- Last things -- The philosopher's widow -- Passages -- Living option.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Although she lived at the center of the much-studied James family, Alice Howe Gibbens James (AHGJ)--wife of Henry James's brother and confidant, philosopher William James--is less well known than other Jameses because she and her descendants destroyed most of her diaries and letters, especially those between AHGJ and her husband. Indeed, Gunter (Westminster College) notes that Gay Wilson Allen's biography William James (CH, Oct'67) "contains information about Alice Howe Gibbens available nowhere else, as he had access to her diaries, which disappeared after the 1960s." The present biography, the first of AHGJ, incorporates material from a group of "over three hundred letters written by Alice," which are on deposit at Harvard's Houghton Library. From this previously unmined material, Gunter develops a portrait of "an idealistic and fundamentally serious young woman" who brought "psychological soundness and unshakeable personal convictions to her union with the Jameses." The abundantly detailed narrative depicts the daily life and interests of an upper-middle-class wife, mother, daughter, sister-in-law, and aunt of the late-19th century and early-20th, a woman enjoying the intellectually privileged society of academics, artists, and other well-known professionals. Invaluable for Jamesians and other specialists. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Graduate students, researchers; general readers. J. J. Benardete The New School

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Susan E. Gunter is Associate Professor of English, Westminster College. She is also editor of "Dear Munificent Friends: Henry James's Letters to Four Women". <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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