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Mean and lowly things : snakes, science, and survival in the Congo / Kate Jackson.

By: Jackson, Kate, 1972-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, ©2008Edition: 1st ed.Description: 1 online resource (vii, 328 pages) : color illustrations, maps.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780674039025; 0674039025.Subject(s): Herpetologists -- Canada -- Biography | Poisonous snakes -- Congo (Brazzaville) -- AnecdotesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Mean and lowly things.DDC classification: 597.96096724 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
How it all started -- Back to the Congo -- In limbo -- The flooded forest -- Neighbors, nets and nothing -- The red snake -- A bottle of snakes -- A day of monsters -- Time to go -- Red tape revisited.
Summary: "In 2005 Kate Jackson ventured into the remote swamp forests of the northern Congo to collect reptiles and amphibians. Her camping equipment was rudimentary, her knowledge of Congolese customs even more so. She knew how to string a net and set a pitfall trap, but she never imagined the physical and cultural difficulties that awaited her."--Jacket.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
QL31.J23 A3 2008 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt13x0jq5 Available ocn442778424

Includes index.

How it all started -- Back to the Congo -- In limbo -- The flooded forest -- Neighbors, nets and nothing -- The red snake -- A bottle of snakes -- A day of monsters -- Time to go -- Red tape revisited.

"In 2005 Kate Jackson ventured into the remote swamp forests of the northern Congo to collect reptiles and amphibians. Her camping equipment was rudimentary, her knowledge of Congolese customs even more so. She knew how to string a net and set a pitfall trap, but she never imagined the physical and cultural difficulties that awaited her."--Jacket.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

It is always exciting to read about remote, natural places in the world and even more so when the story is told by a field researcher. In the tradition of Jane Goodall and more recently Margaret Lowman (Life in the Treetops) and Marty Crump (In Search of the Golden Frog), Jackson (biology, Whitman Coll.) has written a fascinating, adventure-filled memoir, describing how her love of snakes led her to become a herpetologist. She was eventually able to raise money for a survey of reptiles and amphibians in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, specifically in the flooded forest habitat around Lac Tele. Drawing from her journal entries, Jackson takes us through the planning, permits, and travel, as well as her actual time in the field catching animals. Jackson learns to work with her native field staff during her two collecting trips and shows appreciation for all the local people she meets and employs. Her memoir is recommended for academic and public libraries and specialty science high schools.-Margaret Henderson, Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Field biologists know that there are still many areas of the planet that have yet to be explored to discover what species of life are found there. This book is the story of a young herpetologist, Kate Jackson (Whitman College), who ventures into the flooded forest in the remote northern region of the Republic of the Congo, primarily because no one has ever studied the reptiles and amphibians of the region. Along the way, she encounters the difficulties of working in a poor and foreign land, with very primitive living conditions and bad food, but also with the thrill of discovery and of being in a beautiful forest that is seldom visited by humans. Jackson's passion for snakes enables her to persevere through it all. This book will serve as an inspiration to future field biologists. It is also an exciting adventure story for those who would rather avoid the ants, termites, wasps, and the fly maggots that burrow into the biologists' skin and grow larger there. Summing Up: Recommended. All readers/libraries. M. P. Gustafson Texas Lutheran University

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