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Gun crusaders : the NRA's culture war / Scott Melzer.

By: Melzer, Scott [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: New York : New York University Press, ©2009Description: 1 online resource (xii, 323 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781441631565; 1441631569; 9780814759509; 0814759505.Subject(s): Gun control -- United States | Firearms ownership -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Gun crusaders.DDC classification: 323.4/3 LOC classification: HV7436 | .M45 2009Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Frontier masculinity, America's "gun culture," and the NRA -- Why a gun movement? -- Framing threats to gun rights -- Under attack -- Fighting the culture wars -- The politics of commitment -- Right and far-right moral politics -- The ties that bind.
Summary: "Nothing conjures up images of the American frontier and a pick-yourself-up-by-the-bootstraps view of freedom and independence quite like guns. Gun Crusaders is a fascinating inside look at how the four-million member National Rifle Association and its committed members come to see each and every gun control threat as a step down the path towards gun confiscation, and eventually socialism. Enlivened by a rich analysis of NRA materials, meetings, leader speeches, and unique in-depth interviews with NRA members, Gun Crusaders focuses on how the NRA constructs and perceives threats to gun rights as one more attack in a broad liberal cultural war. Scott Melzer shows that the NRA promotes a nostalgic vision of frontier masculinity, whereby gun rights defenders are seen as patriots and freedom fighters, defending not the freedom of religion, but the religion of individual rights and freedoms"--Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HV7436 .M45 2009 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt9qgfdd Available ocn488583422

Includes bibliographical references (pages 271-304) and index.

Frontier masculinity, America's "gun culture," and the NRA -- Why a gun movement? -- Framing threats to gun rights -- Under attack -- Fighting the culture wars -- The politics of commitment -- Right and far-right moral politics -- The ties that bind.

"Nothing conjures up images of the American frontier and a pick-yourself-up-by-the-bootstraps view of freedom and independence quite like guns. Gun Crusaders is a fascinating inside look at how the four-million member National Rifle Association and its committed members come to see each and every gun control threat as a step down the path towards gun confiscation, and eventually socialism. Enlivened by a rich analysis of NRA materials, meetings, leader speeches, and unique in-depth interviews with NRA members, Gun Crusaders focuses on how the NRA constructs and perceives threats to gun rights as one more attack in a broad liberal cultural war. Scott Melzer shows that the NRA promotes a nostalgic vision of frontier masculinity, whereby gun rights defenders are seen as patriots and freedom fighters, defending not the freedom of religion, but the religion of individual rights and freedoms"--Provided by publisher.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The author argues a very credible thesis: that the National Rifle Association (NRA) is more than a single-interest group defending the right to own and bear arms. The NRA should also be understood as a social movement organization dedicated broadly to preserving traditional, conservative values. As such, "today's NRA is a cultural warrior for the Right," taking the side of conservatives and libertarians in opposing the influence of modern liberals and the political Left. Sociologist Melzer (Albion College) documents this development, combining extensive historical and archival research with personal interviews and observation. The end product is a thorough, valuable, and readable study of the organization. However, while the author makes an effort to be fair and objective, his essential lack of sympathy for NRA members' views proves difficult to conceal--for example, his constant suspicion that "gender and race" (i.e., sexism and racism) underlie their beliefs, or his view that "fear" (of losing status) is the basic motivation of their movement. Such reluctance to consider the conservative ideals of the NRA as legitimate views in themselves evinces the same type of liberal disdain that, by the author's account, NRA members so resent. Summing Up: Recommended. All levels/libraries. J. Stauder University of Massachusetts--Dartmouth

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