Disturbing calculations : the economics of identity in postcolonial Southern literature, 1912-2002 / Melanie R. Benson.

By: Taylor, Melanie Benson, 1976-Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksNew southern studies: Publisher: Athens, Ga. : University of Georgia Press, ©2008Description: 1 online resource (xi, 263 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780820336725; 0820336726Subject(s): American literature -- Southern States -- History and criticism | Value in literature | Value -- Psychological aspects | Numbers in literature | Fetishism in literature | Narcissism in literature | Ego (Psychology) in literature | Identity (Psychology) in literatureAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Disturbing calculations.DDC classification: 813/.5093553 LOC classification: PS261 | .B48 2008Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
The fetish of number : narcissism, economics, and the twentieth century Southern ego -- The fetish of surplus value : reconstructing the white elite in Allen Tate, William Alexander Percy, William Faulkner, and Thomas Wolfe -- Stealing themselves out of slavery : African American Southerners in Richard Wright, William Attaway, James Weldon Johnson, and Zora Neale Hurston -- The measures of love : Southern belles and working girls in Frances Newman, Anita Loos, and Katherine Anne Porter -- Contemporary crises of value : white trash, black paralysis, and elite amnesia in Dorothy Allison, Alice Walker, and Walker Percy -- Remembering the missing : Native Americans, immigrants, and Atlanta's murdered children in Louis Owens, Marilou Awiakta, Lan Cao, James Baldwin, Toni Cade Bambara, and Tayari Jones.
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PS261 .B48 2008 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt46n6n9 Available ocn593295497
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PS261 | PS261.S57 2002 Southern Women Playwrights : PS261 | PS261.Y34 2000 Dirt and Desire : PS261 .A788 2012 Transatlantic Renaissances PS261 .B48 2008 Disturbing calculations : PS261 .C436 2012 Personal Souths : PS261 .C45 2019 The whole machinery : PS261.C555 2004 A Companion to the Literature and Culture of the American South.

The fetish of number : narcissism, economics, and the twentieth century Southern ego -- The fetish of surplus value : reconstructing the white elite in Allen Tate, William Alexander Percy, William Faulkner, and Thomas Wolfe -- Stealing themselves out of slavery : African American Southerners in Richard Wright, William Attaway, James Weldon Johnson, and Zora Neale Hurston -- The measures of love : Southern belles and working girls in Frances Newman, Anita Loos, and Katherine Anne Porter -- Contemporary crises of value : white trash, black paralysis, and elite amnesia in Dorothy Allison, Alice Walker, and Walker Percy -- Remembering the missing : Native Americans, immigrants, and Atlanta's murdered children in Louis Owens, Marilou Awiakta, Lan Cao, James Baldwin, Toni Cade Bambara, and Tayari Jones.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 233-251) and index.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The study of Southern literature has evolved into "new Southern literary studies," with many works moving toward transnational considerations and some, like this one, looking inward, especially to minority writers who have been less carefully examined. Benson uses numbers, or "calculations," in texts ranging from early modernist to postmodern works to discern--in provocative and revealing ways--the relations and tensions of class, economy, and race. Among the more notable numerical images used to dispossess and marginalize people are William Faulkner's "ledgers" and Zora Neale Hurston's "gilded six bits." Benson's approaches are inspired by the theories of Bhabha, Marx, and Lacan; accordingly, she helpfully explicates the controlling terms from the various theoretical frames of reference, e.g., fetishism and narcissism. What emerges is the ambivalent tension in the South between the culture of "the lost cause" and modern capitalism. Of particular value are Benson's examinations of literary works by contemporary Native Americans in the South: e.g., the late Choctaw Cherokee novelist Louis Owens and Cherokee Appalachian poet Marilou Awiakta. These and the other works may reveal, as Benson notes, "the peril and promise of change." Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. T. Bonner Jr. emeritus, Xavier University of Louisiana

Author notes provided by Syndetics

MELANIE BENSON TAYLOR is an assistant professor of English and Native American studies at Dartmouth College. She is the author of Disturbing Calculations: The Economics of Identity in Postcolonial Southern Literature, 1912-2002 and Reconstructing the Native South: American Indian Literature and the Lost Cause (both Georgia).

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