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From the New Deal to the New Right : race and the southern origins of modern conservatism / Joseph E. Lowndes.

By: Lowndes, Joseph E, 1966-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: New Haven, Conn. : Yale University Press, ©2008Description: 1 online resource (xi, 208 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780300148282; 0300148283; 1282088750; 9781282088757.Subject(s): Conservatism -- United States -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Print version:: From the New Deal to the New Right.DDC classification: 973.91 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Beyond the backlash thesis -- "White supremacy is a political doctrine": Charles Wallace Collins and the Dixiecrat Revolt of 1948 -- "Goldwater was the horsepower": National Review and the new southern GOP -- "You are southerners too": the national campaign of George Wallace -- "The south, the west, and suburbia": Richard Nixon's new majority -- "Guv'mints lie": Asa Carter, Josey Wales, and the southernization of conservatism after Watergate -- Between political order and change: the contingent construction of the modern right.
Action note: digitized 2010 committed to preserveSummary: The role the South has played in contemporary conservatism is perhaps the most consequential political phenomenon of the second half of the twentieth century. The region's transition from Democratic stronghold to Republican base has frequently been viewed.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E743 .L59 2008 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt1nps6z Available ocn608996083

Includes bibliographical references (pages 185-198) and index.

Beyond the backlash thesis -- "White supremacy is a political doctrine": Charles Wallace Collins and the Dixiecrat Revolt of 1948 -- "Goldwater was the horsepower": National Review and the new southern GOP -- "You are southerners too": the national campaign of George Wallace -- "The south, the west, and suburbia": Richard Nixon's new majority -- "Guv'mints lie": Asa Carter, Josey Wales, and the southernization of conservatism after Watergate -- Between political order and change: the contingent construction of the modern right.

Print version record.

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Master and use copy. Digital master created according to Benchmark for Faithful Digital Reproductions of Monographs and Serials, Version 1. Digital Library Federation, December 2002. MiAaHDL

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digitized 2010 HathiTrust Digital Library committed to preserve pda MiAaHDL

The role the South has played in contemporary conservatism is perhaps the most consequential political phenomenon of the second half of the twentieth century. The region's transition from Democratic stronghold to Republican base has frequently been viewed.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Lowndes (political science, Univ. of Oregon) focuses his study on the emergence of the South as a major force in the development of modern conservatism. Conventional interpretations of the evolution in the conservative movement that ultimately elected Ronald Reagan to the presidency focus on the backlash that developed in the 1960s against more liberal tendencies, which had become standard features of US government since the implementation of Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal. This book challenges that interpretation by arguing that the conservative movement began earlier, with an alliance of southern segregationists and northern conservatives that developed out of their mutual distrust of some New Deal innovations. Lowndes traces the development of that alliance through the states' rights Democratic revolt in 1948, Alabama Governor George Wallace's presidential campaigns, Barry Goldwater's unabashedly conservative presidential campaign in 1964, and the concerted effort by Republican Richard Nixon to capture the South for his party. This book will be an important addition to collections on US politics or the US South, and will be useful to readers seeking an understanding of the conservative influence in the modern US and especially in the modern Republican Party. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All academic levels/libraries. J. P. Sanson Louisiana State University at Alexandria

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