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The rise of the Ku Klux Klan : right-wing movements and national politics / Rory McVeigh.

By: McVeigh, Rory [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Social movements, protest, and contention: v. 32.Publisher: Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, ©2009Description: 1 online resource (244 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780816667765; 0816667764.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Rise of the Ku Klux Klan.DDC classification: 322.4/20973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
The Klan as a national movement -- The rebirth of a Klan nation, 1915-1924 -- Power devaluation -- Responding to economic change : redefining markets along cultural lines -- National politics and mobilizing "100 percent American" voters -- Fights over schools and booze -- How to recruit a Klansman -- Klan activism across the country -- The Klan's last gasp : campaigning to keep a Catholic out of the White House, 1925-1928 -- Conclusion: Right-wing movements, yesterday and today.
Summary: In 1915, forty years after the original Ku Klux Klan disbanded, a former farmer, circuit preacher, and university lecturer named Colonel William Joseph Simmons revived the secret society. By the early 1920s the KKK had been transformed into a national movement with millions of dues-paying members and chapters in all of the nation's forty-eight states. And unlike the Reconstruction-era society, the 1920s-era Klan exerted its influence far beyond the South. In The Rise of the Ku Klux Klan, Rory McVeigh provides a revealing analysis of the broad social agenda of 1920s-era KKK, showing that althoug.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HS2330.K63 M38 2009 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.ctttsd54 Available ocn646884631
Browsing UT Tyler Online Shelves , Shelving location: Online Close shelf browser
HS2330.K63.C75 2012eb Klansville, U.S.A : HS2330 .K63 F64 2011 Everyday Klansfolk : HS2330.K63 F64 2011 Everyday klansfolk : HS2330.K63 M38 2009 The rise of the Ku Klux Klan : HS2330.K63 P37 2015 Ku-Klux : HS2330.K63 .R54 2015 Not a Catholic nation : HS2375 .H45 2012 Organized patriotism and the crucible of war :

Includes bibliographical references and index.

The Klan as a national movement -- The rebirth of a Klan nation, 1915-1924 -- Power devaluation -- Responding to economic change : redefining markets along cultural lines -- National politics and mobilizing "100 percent American" voters -- Fights over schools and booze -- How to recruit a Klansman -- Klan activism across the country -- The Klan's last gasp : campaigning to keep a Catholic out of the White House, 1925-1928 -- Conclusion: Right-wing movements, yesterday and today.

In 1915, forty years after the original Ku Klux Klan disbanded, a former farmer, circuit preacher, and university lecturer named Colonel William Joseph Simmons revived the secret society. By the early 1920s the KKK had been transformed into a national movement with millions of dues-paying members and chapters in all of the nation's forty-eight states. And unlike the Reconstruction-era society, the 1920s-era Klan exerted its influence far beyond the South. In The Rise of the Ku Klux Klan, Rory McVeigh provides a revealing analysis of the broad social agenda of 1920s-era KKK, showing that althoug.

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