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Animal capital : rendering life in biopolitical times / Nicole Shukin.

By: Shukin, Nicole.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Posthumanities: 6.Publisher: Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, ©2009Description: 1 online resource (viii, [307] pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781441612700; 144161270X; 9780816668052; 0816668051.Subject(s): Animals -- Symbolic aspects | Animals -- Economic aspects | Animals -- Political aspects | Human-animal relationships | Wildlife utilizationAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Animal capital.DDC classification: 304.2 LOC classification: GR705 | .S48 2009Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Rendering's modern logics -- Automobility : the animal capital of cars, films, and abattoirs -- Telemobility : telecommunication's animal currencies -- Biomobility : calculating kinship in an era of pandemic speculation.
Summary: The juxtaposition of biopolitical critique and animal studiestwo subjects seldom theorized togethersignals the double-edged intervention of Animal Capital. Nicole Shukin pursues a resolutely materialist engagement with the "question of the animal," challenging the philosophical idealism that has dogged the question by tracing how the politics of capital and of animal life impinge on one another in market cultures of the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
GR705 .S48 2009 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.ctttv1m5 Available ocn647794753

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Rendering's modern logics -- Automobility : the animal capital of cars, films, and abattoirs -- Telemobility : telecommunication's animal currencies -- Biomobility : calculating kinship in an era of pandemic speculation.

Print version record.

The juxtaposition of biopolitical critique and animal studiestwo subjects seldom theorized togethersignals the double-edged intervention of Animal Capital. Nicole Shukin pursues a resolutely materialist engagement with the "question of the animal," challenging the philosophical idealism that has dogged the question by tracing how the politics of capital and of animal life impinge on one another in market cultures of the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Shukin's text is a valuable contribution to animal studies, bringing together Foucaultian biopolitics, Derrida-inspired cultural studies, and Marxist analysis of capital. Deploying the idea of rendering animals in both the representational and material sense, she makes a strong argument that cultural analyses of animals have overemphasized their symbolic nature, contributing to the fetishization and exploitation of animal life within neoliberal capitalism. Sometimes overly theoretical, the book is strongest in its material analyses of rendering, such as the political economy of gelatin, biodiversity as neocolonial multiculturalism, the Fordist economy of slaughterhouses, global pandemics and depictions of "natural threats," and campaigns against coltan mining that link primate gorillas and political guerillas. While touching familiar territory for those approaching animals from a cultural or literary standpoint, Shukin (English, Univ. of Victoria, Canada) pushes the literature toward a more politicized view of animals, reminiscent of that of Donna Haraway, but the conclusion is somewhat lacking in concrete suggestions for political or academic interventions for animals. The writing style is engaging, if sometimes overly dense, and the examples well fleshed out, providing much food for thought for those engaged with animal and cultural studies. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Graduate and research collections. C. E. Rasmussen University of Delaware

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