The unitary executive : presidential power from Washington to Bush / Steven G. Calabresi and Christopher S. Yoo.

By: Calabresi, Steven GContributor(s): Yoo, Christopher SMaterial type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: New Haven, CT : Yale University Press, ©2008Description: 1 online resource (xiii, 544 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780300145380; 0300145381; 128235342X; 9781282353428Subject(s): Executive power -- United States -- History | Presidents -- United States -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Unitary executive.DDC classification: 973.09/9 LOC classification: KF5050 | .C35 2008Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
pt. I. An introduction to the debate over the unitary executive. The oldest debate in constitutional law and why it still matters today ; The modern debate ; Why presidential views of the scope of presidential power matter ; The preratification origins of the unitary executive debate and the decision of 1789 -- pt. II. The unitary executive during the early years of the republic, 1787-1837. George Washington ; John Adams ; Thomas Jefferson ; James Madison ; James Monroe ; John Quincy Adams ; Andrew Jackson -- pt. III. The unitary executive during the Jacksonian period, 1837-1861. Martin Van Buren ; William Henry Harrison ; John Tyler ; James K. Polk ; Zachary Taylor ; Millard Fillmore ; Franklin Pierce ; James Buchanan -- pt. IV. The unitary executive during the Civil War, 1861-1869. Abraham Lincoln ; Andrew Johnson -- pt. V. The unitary executive during the Guilded Age, 1869-1889. Ulysses S. Grant ; Rutherford B. Hayes ; James A. Garfield ; Chester A. Arthur ; Grover Cleveland's first term -- pt. VI. The unitary executive during the rise of the administrative state, 1889-1945. Benjamin Harrison ; Grover Cleveland's second term ; William McKinley ; Theodore Roosevelt ; William H. Taft ; Woodrow Wilson ; Warren G. Harding ; Calvin Coolidge ; Herbert Hoover ; Franklin Delano Roosevelt -- pt. VII. The unitary executive during the modern era, 1945-2007. Harry S. Truman ; Dwight D. Eisenhower ; John F. Kennedy ; Lyndon B. Johnson ; Richard M. Nixon ; Gerald R. Ford ; Jimmy Carter ; Ronald Reagan ; George H.W. Bush ; Bill Clinton ; George W. Bush.
Summary: This is a detailed historical and legal examination of presidential power and the theory of the unitary executive. This theory, that the American Constitution gives the president the power to remove and control all policy-making subordinates in the executive branch, has been the subject of heated debate since the Reagan years.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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KF5050 .C35 2008 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt1nq9nc Available ocn667008760

Includes bibliographical references (pages 511-515) and index.

pt. I. An introduction to the debate over the unitary executive. The oldest debate in constitutional law and why it still matters today ; The modern debate ; Why presidential views of the scope of presidential power matter ; The preratification origins of the unitary executive debate and the decision of 1789 -- pt. II. The unitary executive during the early years of the republic, 1787-1837. George Washington ; John Adams ; Thomas Jefferson ; James Madison ; James Monroe ; John Quincy Adams ; Andrew Jackson -- pt. III. The unitary executive during the Jacksonian period, 1837-1861. Martin Van Buren ; William Henry Harrison ; John Tyler ; James K. Polk ; Zachary Taylor ; Millard Fillmore ; Franklin Pierce ; James Buchanan -- pt. IV. The unitary executive during the Civil War, 1861-1869. Abraham Lincoln ; Andrew Johnson -- pt. V. The unitary executive during the Guilded Age, 1869-1889. Ulysses S. Grant ; Rutherford B. Hayes ; James A. Garfield ; Chester A. Arthur ; Grover Cleveland's first term -- pt. VI. The unitary executive during the rise of the administrative state, 1889-1945. Benjamin Harrison ; Grover Cleveland's second term ; William McKinley ; Theodore Roosevelt ; William H. Taft ; Woodrow Wilson ; Warren G. Harding ; Calvin Coolidge ; Herbert Hoover ; Franklin Delano Roosevelt -- pt. VII. The unitary executive during the modern era, 1945-2007. Harry S. Truman ; Dwight D. Eisenhower ; John F. Kennedy ; Lyndon B. Johnson ; Richard M. Nixon ; Gerald R. Ford ; Jimmy Carter ; Ronald Reagan ; George H.W. Bush ; Bill Clinton ; George W. Bush.

This is a detailed historical and legal examination of presidential power and the theory of the unitary executive. This theory, that the American Constitution gives the president the power to remove and control all policy-making subordinates in the executive branch, has been the subject of heated debate since the Reagan years.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The source of much debate and rancor, the Unitary Executive Theory posited primarily by supporters of the Bush administration calls for an expansive and powerful presidency. Adherents to the theory see its roots in the founding era, but critics are skeptical of such claims. Vast in scope of power and largely unmoored from the separation of powers system created by Madison and the framers, proponents of the unitary executive see a president largely independent of the Congress and able to act with independent authority derived from the vesting clause of the Constitution (the grant of executive power to the president in Article II, Section 1). The authors of this thoughtful and comprehensive work, two well-known legal scholars, are advocates of the Unitary Executive Theory. To their credit, Calabresi (law, Northwestern Univ.) and Yoo (Univ. of Pennsylvania Law School) narrow their focus primarily to the president's removal power and, in doing so, strengthen their case. Their advocacy scholarship is designed to make a case for a strong presidency and, while they on occasion go beyond the evidence in their claims, they make a compelling case that the framers of the Constitution did indeed intend to create a presidency with clear and defined independent power. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-division undergraduate through professional collections. M. A. Genovese Loyola Marymount University

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