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To shake their guns in the tyrant's face : libertarian political violence and the origins of the militia movement / Robert H. Churchill.

By: Churchill, Robert H.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Ann Arbor : University of Michigan Press, ©2009Description: 1 online resource (xiii, 370 pages) : illustrations, map.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780472027460; 0472027468.Subject(s): Militia movements -- United States -- History | Radicalism -- United States -- History | Government, Resistance to -- United States -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Print version:: To shake their guns in the tyrant's face.DDC classification: 322.4/20973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
The precedent of 1774: the role of insurgent violence in the political theory of the founding -- The revolution as living memory: Fries' Rebellion and The Alien and Sedition Act crisis of 1798-1800 -- The libertarian memory of the revolution in the Antebellum Era -- The roots of modern patriotism: conscription, resistance, and the Sons of Liberty conspiracy of 1864 -- Cleansing the memory of the revolution: Americanism, the black legion, and the first Brown Scare -- The making of the second Brown Scare: liberal pluralism and the evolution of the white supremacist right -- The origins of the militia movement: violence and memory on the suburban-rural frontier -- An exploration of militia ideology: the Whig diagnosis of post-Cold War America -- Epilogue: the defense of liberty in the age of terror.
Action note: digitized 2010 committed to preserveSummary: "After the bombings of Oklahoma City in 1995, most Americans were shocked to discover that tens of thousands of their fellow citizens had banded together in homegrown militias. Within the next few years, numerous studies and media reports appeared revealing the unseen world of the American militia movement, a loose alliance of groups with widely divergent views. Not surprisingly, it was the movement's most extreme voices that attracted the lion's share of attention. In reality the militia movement was neither as irrational nor as new as it was portrayed in the press, Robert Churchill writes. What bound the movement together was the shared belief that citizens have a right, even a duty, to take up arms against wanton exercise of unconstitutional power by the federal government. Many were motivated to join the movement by what they saw as a rise in state violence, illustrated by the government assaults at Ruby Ridge, Idaho in 1992, and Waco, Texas in 1993. It was this perception and the determination to deter future state violence, Churchill argues, that played the greatest role in the growth of the American militia movement. Churchill uses three case studies to illustrate the origin of some of the core values of the modern militia movement: Fries' Rebellion in Pennsylvania at the end of the eighteenth century, the Sons of Liberty Conspiracy in Civil War-era Indiana and Illinois, and the Black Legion in Michigan and Ohio during the Depression. Building on extensive interviews with militia members, the author places the contemporary militia movement in the context of these earlier insurrectionary movements that, animated by a libertarian interpretation of the American Revolution, used force to resist the authority of the federal government"--Publisher's description.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HN90.R3 C485 2009 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.3998/mpub.327258 Available ocn680623241

Includes bibliographical references (pages 287-353) and index.

The precedent of 1774: the role of insurgent violence in the political theory of the founding -- The revolution as living memory: Fries' Rebellion and The Alien and Sedition Act crisis of 1798-1800 -- The libertarian memory of the revolution in the Antebellum Era -- The roots of modern patriotism: conscription, resistance, and the Sons of Liberty conspiracy of 1864 -- Cleansing the memory of the revolution: Americanism, the black legion, and the first Brown Scare -- The making of the second Brown Scare: liberal pluralism and the evolution of the white supremacist right -- The origins of the militia movement: violence and memory on the suburban-rural frontier -- An exploration of militia ideology: the Whig diagnosis of post-Cold War America -- Epilogue: the defense of liberty in the age of terror.

"After the bombings of Oklahoma City in 1995, most Americans were shocked to discover that tens of thousands of their fellow citizens had banded together in homegrown militias. Within the next few years, numerous studies and media reports appeared revealing the unseen world of the American militia movement, a loose alliance of groups with widely divergent views. Not surprisingly, it was the movement's most extreme voices that attracted the lion's share of attention. In reality the militia movement was neither as irrational nor as new as it was portrayed in the press, Robert Churchill writes. What bound the movement together was the shared belief that citizens have a right, even a duty, to take up arms against wanton exercise of unconstitutional power by the federal government. Many were motivated to join the movement by what they saw as a rise in state violence, illustrated by the government assaults at Ruby Ridge, Idaho in 1992, and Waco, Texas in 1993. It was this perception and the determination to deter future state violence, Churchill argues, that played the greatest role in the growth of the American militia movement. Churchill uses three case studies to illustrate the origin of some of the core values of the modern militia movement: Fries' Rebellion in Pennsylvania at the end of the eighteenth century, the Sons of Liberty Conspiracy in Civil War-era Indiana and Illinois, and the Black Legion in Michigan and Ohio during the Depression. Building on extensive interviews with militia members, the author places the contemporary militia movement in the context of these earlier insurrectionary movements that, animated by a libertarian interpretation of the American Revolution, used force to resist the authority of the federal government"--Publisher's description.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In a riveting book, Churchill (Univ. of Hartford) examines the rise of the US militia movement that became manifest after the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing. The explosion killed 169 people, constituting the worst terrorist attack on US soil to that point in history. In the days after the explosion, Americans learned about various militia groups, and these organizations were demonized as anti-government extremists that posed a direct threat to the American public. Churchill scrupulously researched the topic, dismantling the mainstream interpretations of the militia movement and establishing connections between the contemporary movement and earlier manifestations that cropped up to challenge the authority of the federal government. The book follows a case-study approach and is hardly comprehensive, but by any standard the finished product stands as a welcome contribution, placing the militia movement and its ideas within the context of the US experience. There is no formal bibliography, but the endnotes amplify the text, and the book also contains an interesting appendix. Churchill has made an invaluable contribution to understanding the complex militia movement, and this reviewer hopes to see additional work from this historian. Summing Up: Essential. All levels/libraries. J. B. Cook North Greenville University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> Robert H. Churchill is Associate Professor of History at the University of Hartford.</p>

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