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Larry Brown and the blue-collar South / edited by Jean W. Cash and Keith Perry.

Contributor(s): Cash, Jean W, 1938- | Perry, Keith Ronald, 1967-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, ©2008Description: 1 online resource (xxxvi, 184 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781604736366; 1604736364.Subject(s): Working class in literature | Rural conditions in literatureAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Larry Brown and the blue-collar South.DDC classification: 813/.54 LOC classification: PS3552.R6927 | Z75 2008Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Larry Brown: an introduction / Jean W. Cash -- Facing the musk: what's wrong with all those happy endings / Darlin' Neal -- Implicating the reader: Dirty work and the burdens of southern history / Robert Donahoo -- Saving them from their lives: storytelling and self-fulfillment in Big bad love / Jean W. Cash -- Economics of the cracker landscape: poverty as an environmental issue in Larry Brown's Joe / Jay Watson -- The white trash cowboys of Father and son / Thomas Aervold Bjerre -- Hard traveling: Fay's deep-south landscape of violence / Robert Beuka -- Home and the open road: the nonfiction of Larry Brown / Robert G. Barrier -- The rabbit factory: escaping the isolation of the cage / Richard Gaughran -- A miracle of catfish and the recursions of art / John A. Staunton -- Fireman-writer, bad boy novelist, king of grit lit: "building" Larry Brown(s) at Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill / Keith Perry -- Afterword: on the rough south of Larry Brown: an interview with filmmaker Gary Hawkins / Katherine Powell.
Action note: digitized 2010 committed to preserveSummary: Larry Brown and the Blue-Collar South considers the writer's full body of work, placing it in the contexts of southern literature, Mississippi writing, and literary work about the working class. Collectively, the essays explore such subjects as Brown's treatment of class politics, race and racism, the aftereffects of the Vietnam War on American culture, the evolution of the South from a plantation-based economy to a postindustrial one, and male-female relations. The role of Brown's mentors--Ellen Douglas and Barry Hannah--in shaping his work is discussed, as is Brown's connection to such write.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PS3552.R6927 Z75 2008 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt2tvjrv Available ocn690211865

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Larry Brown: an introduction / Jean W. Cash -- Facing the musk: what's wrong with all those happy endings / Darlin' Neal -- Implicating the reader: Dirty work and the burdens of southern history / Robert Donahoo -- Saving them from their lives: storytelling and self-fulfillment in Big bad love / Jean W. Cash -- Economics of the cracker landscape: poverty as an environmental issue in Larry Brown's Joe / Jay Watson -- The white trash cowboys of Father and son / Thomas Aervold Bjerre -- Hard traveling: Fay's deep-south landscape of violence / Robert Beuka -- Home and the open road: the nonfiction of Larry Brown / Robert G. Barrier -- The rabbit factory: escaping the isolation of the cage / Richard Gaughran -- A miracle of catfish and the recursions of art / John A. Staunton -- Fireman-writer, bad boy novelist, king of grit lit: "building" Larry Brown(s) at Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill / Keith Perry -- Afterword: on the rough south of Larry Brown: an interview with filmmaker Gary Hawkins / Katherine Powell.

Larry Brown and the Blue-Collar South considers the writer's full body of work, placing it in the contexts of southern literature, Mississippi writing, and literary work about the working class. Collectively, the essays explore such subjects as Brown's treatment of class politics, race and racism, the aftereffects of the Vietnam War on American culture, the evolution of the South from a plantation-based economy to a postindustrial one, and male-female relations. The role of Brown's mentors--Ellen Douglas and Barry Hannah--in shaping his work is discussed, as is Brown's connection to such write.

Print version record.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

A Mississippian by birth, Brown (1951-2004) wrote novels, short fiction, and nonfiction. His principal interest, as the title of this collection indicates, was the rural working class in the South. His work fits well with writing by Harry Crews, Barry Hannah, and Cormac McCarthy. This is the second book-length work addressing Brown and his writing, the first being Conversations with Larry Brown, ed. by Jay Watson (2007), a contributor to the present volume. Cash (James Madison Univ.) and Perry (Dalton State College) include essays on all ten of Brown's works, from his first story collection (Facing the Music, 1988) to his posthumously published novel (A Miracle of Catfish, 2007). The contributors offer balanced, incisive views of Brown's life and writing. The volume includes an interview with Gary Hawkins, who made a film of Brown and his family (The Rough South of Larry Brown, 2002), and a fine foreword by Rick Bass. Accessible to anyone reading or studying Brown's fiction, this collection builds a base for further biographical and critical considerations and their connections. Summing Up: Essential. All readers, all levels. T. Bonner Jr. emeritus, Xavier University of Louisiana

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