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The net effect : romanticism, capitalism, and the internet / Thomas Streeter.

By: Streeter, Thomas.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Critical cultural communication: Publisher: New York : New York University Press, ©2011Description: 1 online resource (ix, 219 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780814741177; 0814741177; 9780814708743; 0814708749.Subject(s): Computers and civilization | Computers -- Social aspects | Information technology -- Social aspects | Internet -- Social aspectsAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Net effect.DDC classification: 303.48/33 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
"Self-motivating exhilaration": on the cultural sources of computer communication -- Romanticism and the machine: the formation of the computer counter-culture -- Missing the net: the 1980s, microcomputers, and the rise of neoliberalism -- Networks and the social imagination -- The moment of wired -- Open source, the expressive programmer, and the problem of property -- Conclusion: capitalism, passions, democracy.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
QA76.9.C66 S884 2011 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt9qfwf9 Available ocn692204519

Includes bibliographical references and index.

"Self-motivating exhilaration": on the cultural sources of computer communication -- Romanticism and the machine: the formation of the computer counter-culture -- Missing the net: the 1980s, microcomputers, and the rise of neoliberalism -- Networks and the social imagination -- The moment of wired -- Open source, the expressive programmer, and the problem of property -- Conclusion: capitalism, passions, democracy.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The Net Effect is an excellent resource for anyone researching the influence of society on technology. Traditionally, corporations and computer information specialists that emphasized "technological determinism" (i.e., technology shapes society) seemed to have a larger voice. This book does a good job of offering counterarguments to this technological determinist view and other commonly held beliefs. Streeter (sociology, Univ. of Vermont; Selling the Air, CH, Nov'96, 34-1621) takes readers through the history of computers, with a focus on people as active participants in technology developments, not just as recipients of technology. The author provides an endless number of historical examples of how society, politics, and businesses influenced the direction of computers and technology. This work is perfect for a student searching for a specific example or case study for a paper. It is also useful for computer information specialists, especially those interested in human-computer interaction. The coverage of the romanticism intrinsic to the open source community will be important to many programmers. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Academic, general, and professional readers, all levels. S. A. Patton Delta State University

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