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Body language : sisters in shape, black women's fitness, and feminist identity politics / Kimberly J. Lau.

By: Lau, Kimberly J.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Philadelphia, Pa. : Temple University Press, ©2011Description: 1 online resource (xi, 187 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781439903100; 1439903107.Subject(s): Feminism -- United States | Feminist theory -- Political aspects | Group identity -- United States | African American women -- Social conditions | Self-care, Health -- United States | Women -- Socialization -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Body language.DDC classification: 305.48/896073 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
The anatomy of a movement -- Experience : spirituality, sisterhood, and the unspeakable -- Performance : negotiating multiple black womanhoods -- New bodies of knowledge -- Re-articulating feminist identity politics.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HQ1181.U5 L38 2011 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt14btb4k Available ocn747013364

Includes bibliographical references (pages 171-183) and index.

Print version record.

The anatomy of a movement -- Experience : spirituality, sisterhood, and the unspeakable -- Performance : negotiating multiple black womanhoods -- New bodies of knowledge -- Re-articulating feminist identity politics.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Lau (literature and American studies, Univ. of California, Santa Cruz) has authored a theoretically nuanced ethnographic study of Sisters in Shape (SIS), technically a consulting firm of personal trainers located in Philadelphia. SIS is a community providing mutual aid in meeting fitness goals for health promotion based on group fitness classes, nutritional counseling and cooking classes, annual symposia, and a feeling of community, acceptance, and empowerment for black women. Lau describes the ways in which the discourses of self-esteem enacted by SIS members engage women to improve personal fitness as well as family and community health. Perhaps not as critical of the neoliberal tendencies of self-esteem discourses as might be warranted, the author negotiates the postmodern critiques of identity politics while taking very seriously SIS members' own invocations of identity and the intersections of racism, classism, and heteronormativity that shape their exercise and diet habits. She also listens carefully to the women as they integrate spiritual, social, and health goals and negotiate familial and cultural expectations. The future orientation of SIS fitness discourse provides a potential way of reimagining identity politics as situated knowledges, accommodating postmodern critique and lived experience. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. J. L. Croissant University of Arizona

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> Kimberly J. Lau is Professor of Literature and American Studies at the University of California, Santa Cruz. She is the author of New Age Capitalism: Making Money East of Eden .</p>

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