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Fiction across borders : imagining the lives of others in late-twentieth-century novels / Shameem Black.

By: Black, Shameem, 1976-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: New York : Columbia University Press, ©2010Description: 1 online resource (xii, 333 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780231520614; 0231520611; 1283260999; 9781283260992.Other title: Imagining the lives of others in late-twentieth-century novels.Subject(s): American fiction -- Minority authors -- History and criticism | Commonwealth fiction (English) -- History and criticism | Other (Philosophy) in literature | Difference (Philosophy) in literature | Ethics in literatureAdditional physical formats: Print version:: No titleDDC classification: 810.9/920693 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction: Toward an Ethics of Border-Crossing Fiction -- 1. Crowded Self and Crowded Style -- 2. Everyday Sentiment -- 3. Ethnic Reversals -- 4. Middle Grounds -- 5. Challenging Language -- 6. Sacrificing the Self --- Postscript --- Appendix.
Action note: digitized 2011 committed to preserveSummary: Theorists of Orientalism and postcolonialism argue that novelists betray political and cultural anxieties when characterizing "the Other." Shameem Black takes a different stance. Turning a fresh eye toward several key contemporary novelists, she reveals how "border-crossing" fiction represents socially diverse groups without resorting to stereotype, idealization, or other forms of imaginative constraint. Focusing on the work of J.M. Coetzee, Amitav Ghosh, Jeffrey Eugenides, Ruth Ozeki, Charles Johnson, Gish Jen, and Rupa Bajwa, Black introduces an interpretative lens that captures the ways in which these authors envision an ethics of representing social difference. They not only offer sympathetic portrayals of the lives of others but also detail the processes of imagining social difference. Whether depicting the multilingual worlds of South and Southeast Asia, the exportation of American culture abroad, or the racial tension of postapartheid South Africa, these transcultural representations explore social and political hierarchies in constructive ways. Boldly confronting the orthodoxies of recent literary criticism, Fiction Across Borders builds upon such seminal works as Edward Said's Orientalism and offers a provocative new study of the late twentieth-century novel.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PS153.M56 B62 2010 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7312/blac14978 Available ocn747305638

Includes bibliographical references (pages 299-318) and index.

Introduction: Toward an Ethics of Border-Crossing Fiction -- 1. Crowded Self and Crowded Style -- 2. Everyday Sentiment -- 3. Ethnic Reversals -- 4. Middle Grounds -- 5. Challenging Language -- 6. Sacrificing the Self --- Postscript --- Appendix.

Theorists of Orientalism and postcolonialism argue that novelists betray political and cultural anxieties when characterizing "the Other." Shameem Black takes a different stance. Turning a fresh eye toward several key contemporary novelists, she reveals how "border-crossing" fiction represents socially diverse groups without resorting to stereotype, idealization, or other forms of imaginative constraint. Focusing on the work of J.M. Coetzee, Amitav Ghosh, Jeffrey Eugenides, Ruth Ozeki, Charles Johnson, Gish Jen, and Rupa Bajwa, Black introduces an interpretative lens that captures the ways in which these authors envision an ethics of representing social difference. They not only offer sympathetic portrayals of the lives of others but also detail the processes of imagining social difference. Whether depicting the multilingual worlds of South and Southeast Asia, the exportation of American culture abroad, or the racial tension of postapartheid South Africa, these transcultural representations explore social and political hierarchies in constructive ways. Boldly confronting the orthodoxies of recent literary criticism, Fiction Across Borders builds upon such seminal works as Edward Said's Orientalism and offers a provocative new study of the late twentieth-century novel.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The depoliticization of American criticism since the mid-1980s enabled the development of an ethics of reading that, though driven by a laudable desire for engagement with the diasporic and transnational Other, often resulted in pious self-congratulation for openness to such encounters--a danger accentuated by insufficiently wary engagement with Emmanuel Levinas's work on the ethical subject. It is therefore a pleasure to read a rich, learned study that explores the ethics of reading, avoids narrow theoretical adherence, develops a useful notion of the "crowded self," and delivers productive analyses of a wide variety of texts. There are extended analyses linked to the novels of Amitav Ghosh and J. M. Coetzee; helpful comments on Jeffrey Eugenides, Gish Jen, Charles Johnson, Salman Rushdie, Japanese American writer Ruth Ozeki, and Sikh Indian novelist Rupa Bajwa; and an astute puncturing of V. S. Naipaul's role in sustaining misogyny and Western condescension toward former colonial peoples. This title belongs in the emerging canon of studies of transnationalism, alongside Mary Louise Pratt's Imperial Eyes (CH, Oct'92, 30-0736), Rey Chow's Writing Diaspora (1993), Neil Lazarus's Nationalism and Cultural Practice in the Postcolonial World (CH, Dec'99, 37-2229), Priya Joshi's In Another Country (CH, Nov'02, 40-1396), and Katherine Stanton's Cosmopolitan Fictions (2006). Summing Up: Essential. All academic readers. K. Tololyan Wesleyan University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Shameem Black is assistant professor of English at Yale University, where she specializes in questions of globalization in contemporary literature.

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