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Constitution 3.0 : Freedom and Technological Change.

By: Rosen, Jeffrey, 1964-.
Contributor(s): Wittes, Benjamin.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Washington : Brookings Institution Press, 2011Description: 1 online resource (284 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780815722137; 0815722133.Subject(s): Constitutional law -- United States | Technology and law -- United States | Civil rights -- United States | Information technology -- Law and legislation -- United States | Freedom of expression -- United States | Privacy, Right of -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Constitution 3.0 : Freedom and Technological Change.DDC classification: 342.7300112 | 342.7308/5 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Front Cover; Front Flap; Title Page; Copyright Information; Table of Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction: Technological Change and the Constitutional Future; Part 1: The Future of Surveillance; Is the Fourth Amendment Relevant in a Technological Age?; Use Restrictions and the Future of Surveillance Law; Cyberthreat, Government Network Operations, and the Fourth Amendment; Part 2: The Future of Free Expression and Privacy; The Deciders: Facebook, Google, and the Future of Privacy and Free Speech; Is Filtering Censorship? The Second Free Speech Tradition.
A Mutual Aid Treaty for the InternetPart 3: The Future of Neurolaw; Neuroscience and the Future of Personhood and Responsibility; Cognitive Neuroscience and the Future of Punishment; Part 4: Genetic Engineering and the Future of Constitutional Personhood; Reproductive Rights and Reproductive Technology in 2030; The Problems and Possibilities of Modern Genetics: A Paradigm for Social, Ethical, and Political Analysis; Endowed by Their Creator? The Future of Constitutional Personhood; Innovation's Darker Future: Biosecurity, Technologies of Mass Empowerment, and the Constitution.
Epilogue: Translating and Transforming the FutureContributors; Index; Back Flap; Back Cover.
Summary: At the beginning of the twenty-first century, breathtaking changes in technology are posing stark challenges to our constitutional values. From free speech to privacy, from liberty and personal autonomy to the right against self-incrimination, basic constitutional principles are under stress from technological advances unimaginable even a fewdecades ago, let alone during the founding era. In this provocative collection, America's leading scholars of technology, law, and ethics imagine how to translate and preserve constitutional and legal values at a time of dizzying technological change. Const.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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KF4550 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7864/j.ctt6wpdhr Available ocn767502495

Print version record.

Front Cover; Front Flap; Title Page; Copyright Information; Table of Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction: Technological Change and the Constitutional Future; Part 1: The Future of Surveillance; Is the Fourth Amendment Relevant in a Technological Age?; Use Restrictions and the Future of Surveillance Law; Cyberthreat, Government Network Operations, and the Fourth Amendment; Part 2: The Future of Free Expression and Privacy; The Deciders: Facebook, Google, and the Future of Privacy and Free Speech; Is Filtering Censorship? The Second Free Speech Tradition.

A Mutual Aid Treaty for the InternetPart 3: The Future of Neurolaw; Neuroscience and the Future of Personhood and Responsibility; Cognitive Neuroscience and the Future of Punishment; Part 4: Genetic Engineering and the Future of Constitutional Personhood; Reproductive Rights and Reproductive Technology in 2030; The Problems and Possibilities of Modern Genetics: A Paradigm for Social, Ethical, and Political Analysis; Endowed by Their Creator? The Future of Constitutional Personhood; Innovation's Darker Future: Biosecurity, Technologies of Mass Empowerment, and the Constitution.

Epilogue: Translating and Transforming the FutureContributors; Index; Back Flap; Back Cover.

At the beginning of the twenty-first century, breathtaking changes in technology are posing stark challenges to our constitutional values. From free speech to privacy, from liberty and personal autonomy to the right against self-incrimination, basic constitutional principles are under stress from technological advances unimaginable even a fewdecades ago, let alone during the founding era. In this provocative collection, America's leading scholars of technology, law, and ethics imagine how to translate and preserve constitutional and legal values at a time of dizzying technological change. Const.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> Jeffrey Rosen is a professor of law at the George Washington University Law School, the legal affairs editor of The New Republic , and a nonresident senior fellow at Brookings. His books include The Unwanted Gaze , The Naked Crowd , and The Supreme Court .</p> <p> Benjamin Wittes is a senior fellow in Governance Studies at the Brookings Institution. He is the author of Law and the Long War and Detention and Denial .</p>

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