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The great American mission : modernization and the construction of an American world order / David Ekbladh.

By: Ekbladh, David, 1972-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.America in the world: Publisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, ©2010Description: 1 online resource (xvi, 386 pages) : illustrations, map.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781400833740; 1400833744; 9786613339751; 661333975X; 1283339757; 9781283339759.Subject(s): Economic development -- United States -- History | Economic assistance, American -- History | Industrial policy -- United States -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Great American Mission : Modernization and the Construction of an American World Order.DDC classification: 338.91/73 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; The Great American Mission; Title; Copyright; Dedication; CONTENTS; List of Illustrations; Acknowledgments; List of Abbreviations; INTRODUCTION; CHAPTER 1; The Rise of an American Style of Development, 1914-1937; CHAPTER 2; The Only Road for Mankind: "Modernisation" to Meetthe Challenge of Totalitarianism, 1933-1944; CHAPTER 3; A Gospel of Liberalism: Point Four and Modernization asNational Policy, 1943-1952; CHAPTER 4; "The Proving Ground": Modernization and U.S. Policy in Northeast Asia, 1945-1960; CHAPTER 5.
"The Great American Mission": Modernization andthe United States in the World, 1952-1960CHAPTER 6; A TVA on the Mekong: Modernization at War in SoutheastAsia, 1960-1973; CHAPTER 7; "Everything Is Going Wrong": The Crisis of Development and the End of the Postwar Consensus; CHAPTER 8; New Developments: From the Cold War to the "War on Terror"; Notes; Bibliography; Index.
Summary: The Great American Mission traces how America's global modernization efforts during the twentieth century were a means to remake the world in its own image. David Ekbladh shows that the emerging concept of modernization combined existing development ideas from the Depression. He describes how ambitious New Deal programs like the Tennessee Valley Authority became symbols of American liberalism's ability to marshal the social sciences, state planning, civil society, and technology to produce extensive social and economic change. For proponents, it became a valuable weapon to check the influence.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HC110.E44 E43 2010 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt7sg53 Available ocn774285491

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Cover; The Great American Mission; Title; Copyright; Dedication; CONTENTS; List of Illustrations; Acknowledgments; List of Abbreviations; INTRODUCTION; CHAPTER 1; The Rise of an American Style of Development, 1914-1937; CHAPTER 2; The Only Road for Mankind: "Modernisation" to Meetthe Challenge of Totalitarianism, 1933-1944; CHAPTER 3; A Gospel of Liberalism: Point Four and Modernization asNational Policy, 1943-1952; CHAPTER 4; "The Proving Ground": Modernization and U.S. Policy in Northeast Asia, 1945-1960; CHAPTER 5.

"The Great American Mission": Modernization andthe United States in the World, 1952-1960CHAPTER 6; A TVA on the Mekong: Modernization at War in SoutheastAsia, 1960-1973; CHAPTER 7; "Everything Is Going Wrong": The Crisis of Development and the End of the Postwar Consensus; CHAPTER 8; New Developments: From the Cold War to the "War on Terror"; Notes; Bibliography; Index.

The Great American Mission traces how America's global modernization efforts during the twentieth century were a means to remake the world in its own image. David Ekbladh shows that the emerging concept of modernization combined existing development ideas from the Depression. He describes how ambitious New Deal programs like the Tennessee Valley Authority became symbols of American liberalism's ability to marshal the social sciences, state planning, civil society, and technology to produce extensive social and economic change. For proponents, it became a valuable weapon to check the influence.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Ekbladh (Tufts) argues that in the 20th century, the US used modernization as a foreign aid strategy, intent on projecting its values abroad. The successful Depression-era Tennessee Valley Authority became a model of what liberal capitalism and US technology could accomplish. Augmented by non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and international organizations under US influence, it became the antidote to totalitarian claims of rapid development in the 1930s and the appeal of the Soviet Union's industrialization during the Cold War. In the 1960s and 1970s, this model came under fire, even as Taiwan and South Korea emerged as success stories of US-style development. Recognition of the environment and poverty as significant Global South issues not addressed by the US model undercut its appeal, as did the war in Vietnam. By the late 20th century, the model staged a comeback, repackaged as "sustainable development." Ekbladh offers a sweeping, provocative appraisal of the US attempt to employ development as an ideological weapon. Although the war in Iraq discouraged private foundations and NGOs from supporting the model, he concludes, "the utility of the concept assures that it will play a critical role in shaping global affairs." Summing Up: Recommended. Most levels/libraries. A. J. Dunar University of Alabama in Huntsville

Author notes provided by Syndetics

David Ekbladh is assistant professor of history at Tufts University.

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