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Cinematic Cold War : the American and Soviet struggle for hearts and minds / Tony Shaw and Denise J. Youngblood.

By: Shaw, Tony, 1965-.
Contributor(s): Youngblood, Denise J. (Denise Jeanne), 1952-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Lawrence : University Press of Kansas, ©2010Description: 1 online resource (ix, 301 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780700620616; 0700620613.Subject(s): Cold War in motion pictures | Politics in motion pictures | Motion pictures -- Political aspects -- United States | Motion pictures -- Political aspects -- Soviet UnionAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Cinematic Cold War.DDC classification: 791.43/6582825 Other classification: 24.32 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction : culture, film and the "new" Cold War history -- Industry, state, and Cold War contours. American cinema and the Cold War -- Soviet cinema and the Cold War -- Sites of conflict. Justifying war -- Pleasure versus progress -- Deterrence and dissent -- Conservatism versus anarchy -- Last acts -- Conclusion.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PN1995.9.P6 S525 2010 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt1c6v8wf Available ocn776795054

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Includes filmography.

Introduction : culture, film and the "new" Cold War history -- Industry, state, and Cold War contours. American cinema and the Cold War -- Soviet cinema and the Cold War -- Sites of conflict. Justifying war -- Pleasure versus progress -- Deterrence and dissent -- Conservatism versus anarchy -- Last acts -- Conclusion.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The overarching subject matter of this excellent study is familiar territory for both Shaw (Univ. of Hertfordshire, UK) and Youngblood (Univ. of Vermont). The former's Hollywood's Cold War (CH, Dec'08, 46-2292) and the latter's Russian War Films: On the Cinema Front, 1914-2005 (CH, Jun'07, 44-5550) are both exemplary scholarly texts concerning the role that film played during the Cold War in the US and Soviet Union, respectively. For this volume, they combine their expertise to produce a comparative study that expands on and enhances the utility of many of the observations they have made individually in their previous works. The opening section still largely separates the two Cold War superpowers in foregrounding the relationships among ideological principles, the film industry, and individual artists in each country. However, in the second part of the book ("Sites of Conflict"), the authors combine forces to compare treatment of similar themes in five pairs of representative films, one from each country. One can perhaps quibble with the authors' selection of films, but the depth and clarity of their analysis clearly benefits from this constant juxtaposition. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty and professionals; general readers. D. C. Maus State University of New York College at Potsdam

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