Democracy's Blameless Leaders : From Dresden to Abu Ghraib, How Leaders Evade Accountability for Abuse, Atrocity, and Killing / Neil James Mitchell.

By: Mitchell, Neil J. (Neil James), 1953-Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: New York : New York University, 2012Description: 1 online resourceContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780814763377; 0814763375; 9780814763384; 0814763383Subject(s): Political leadership -- Moral and ethical aspects -- Case studies | Democracy -- Moral and ethical aspects -- Case studies | Civilians in war -- Crimes against -- Case studies | Criminal liability (International law) -- Case studies | Atrocities -- Case studies | Government accountability -- Case studiesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Democracy's blameless leaders.DDC classification: 303.3/4 LOC classification: JC330.3 | .M57 2012Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; Preface; 1 Introduction; 2 The Theory of the Fall Guy; 3 Evading Accountability; 4 Amritsar; 5 Dresden; 6 Londonderry; 7 Beirut; 8 Baghdad; 9 Baghdad to Basra; 10 A Tale of a Few Cities: Better Leaders, Better Institutions, or a Better Audience?; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Z; About the Author.
Summary: From the American and British counter-insurgency in Iraq to the bombing of Dresden and the Amristar Massacre in India, civilians are often abused and killed when they are caught in the cross-fire of wars and other conflicts. In Democracy's Blameless Leaders, Neil Mitchell examines how leaders in democracies manage the blame for the abuse and the killing of civilians, arguing that politicians are likely to react in a self-interested and opportunistic way and seek to deny and evade accountability. Using empirical evidence from well-known cases of abuse and atrocity committed by the security forc.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
JC330.3 .M57 2012 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt9qfsr9 Available ocn778454572

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Print version record.

Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; Preface; 1 Introduction; 2 The Theory of the Fall Guy; 3 Evading Accountability; 4 Amritsar; 5 Dresden; 6 Londonderry; 7 Beirut; 8 Baghdad; 9 Baghdad to Basra; 10 A Tale of a Few Cities: Better Leaders, Better Institutions, or a Better Audience?; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Z; About the Author.

From the American and British counter-insurgency in Iraq to the bombing of Dresden and the Amristar Massacre in India, civilians are often abused and killed when they are caught in the cross-fire of wars and other conflicts. In Democracy's Blameless Leaders, Neil Mitchell examines how leaders in democracies manage the blame for the abuse and the killing of civilians, arguing that politicians are likely to react in a self-interested and opportunistic way and seek to deny and evade accountability. Using empirical evidence from well-known cases of abuse and atrocity committed by the security forc.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Mitchell (Univ. College London, UK) demonstrates that democratic leaders are not held accountable for war crimes and human rights abuses in various situations. They dissemble and deceive without retribution, as legislatures and publics prove unable to emphasize honor and rule of law. His interpretation is based on six cases: the 1919 Amritsar massacre in colonial India; the bombing of Dresden during WW II; another British massacre in Londonderry, Northern Ireland, in 1972; the Israeli-organized massacre of Palestinians in 1982 near Beirut; the American torture at Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq during 2003; and the British military record in Iraq during and after 2003. Given the continuing strength of a narrow nationalism in most states, which prioritizes national security over protecting universal human rights, the author's pessimism is justified. An important point is not drawn from this highly recommended study: those who stress the role of a "league of democracies" in world affairs are misguided. Democracies, too, violate international standards with impunity, as leaders transfer assigned responsibility downward rather than acting with honor to accept their responsibility for misdeeds. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Lower-division undergraduates and above. D. P. Forsythe emeritus, University of Nebraska

Author notes provided by Syndetics

MitchellNeil James:

Neil James Mitchell is Professor of International Relations in the School of Public Policy at University College London and author of Agents of Atrocity: Leaders,Followers, and the Violation of Human Rights in Civil War.

There are no comments on this title.

to post a comment.