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The Hebrew republic : Jewish sources and the transformation of European political thought / Eric Nelson.

By: Nelson, Eric, 1977-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 2010Description: 1 online resource (229 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780674056749; 0674056744.Subject(s): Jews -- Politics and government -- To 70 A.D | Judaism and politics -- History of doctrines | Politics in rabbinical literature | Political science -- Europe -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Hebrew republic.DDC classification: 320.01/1 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
"Talmudical commonwealthsmen" and the rise of republican exclusivism -- "For the land is mine" : the Hebrew commonwealth and the rise of redistribution -- Hebrew theocracy and the rise of toleration.
Review: "According to a commonplace narrative, the rise of modern political thought in the West resulted from secularization - the exclusion of religious arguments from political discourse. But in this work Eric Nelson argues that this familiar story is wrong. Instead, he contends, political thought in early-modern Europe became less, not more, secular with time, and it was the Christian encounter with Hebrew sources that provoked this radical transformation."--Jacket.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
JC67 .N45 2010 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt13x0g1v Available ocn779172986

Includes bibliographical references and index.

"Talmudical commonwealthsmen" and the rise of republican exclusivism -- "For the land is mine" : the Hebrew commonwealth and the rise of redistribution -- Hebrew theocracy and the rise of toleration.

"According to a commonplace narrative, the rise of modern political thought in the West resulted from secularization - the exclusion of religious arguments from political discourse. But in this work Eric Nelson argues that this familiar story is wrong. Instead, he contends, political thought in early-modern Europe became less, not more, secular with time, and it was the Christian encounter with Hebrew sources that provoked this radical transformation."--Jacket.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Nelson (Harvard Univ.) advances a simple thesis: three political ideas central to modernity--modern republicanism, redistribution of wealth, and religious tolerance--come from not only a secularizing movement, beginning with the Renaissance and culminating in the Enlightenment, but also (or ultimately) out of the emphatically theological reflections of the 17th century. Students of this era have already noted a more theological flavor of political thought during the "Biblical century" than in the centuries that followed and preceded it. Nelson powerfully argues that this period had as its driving force an intense scholarly interest in the Israelite constitution, occasioned by the discovery of new Rabbinic texts and the growth of Hebrew scholarship in Europe. Nelson's account is remarkable because it shows just how serious great political thinkers of the 17th century were about the details of an ancient polity that many or most Christian scholars of the time believed was God's approved constitution for all time. No matter how much contemporary political thought really is a product of the 17th century, Nelson explains, modern political theory has deeper theological roots than is generally believed. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All undergraduate, graduate, research, and professional collections. J. John Southern Virginia University

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