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Snitching : Criminal Informants and the Erosion of American Justice.

By: Natapoff, Alexandra.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: New York : NYU Press, 2009Description: 1 online resource (273 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780814759042; 0814759041.Subject(s): Law enforcement -- United States | Informers -- United States | Criminal justice, Administration of -- United States | Informers -- Legal status, laws, etc. -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Snitching : Criminal Informants and the Erosion of American Justice.DDC classification: 363.25/2 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Acknowledgments; Introduction; Chapter 1: The Real Deal: Understanding Snitching; I. Anatomy of an Informant Deal; A. Police; B. Prosecutors; C. Defense Counsel; D. The Crimes; E. The Rewards; II. Implications of Informant Practices; A. Crime-Fighting Benefits; B. Compromising the Purposes of Law Enforcement; C. Who's in Charge around Here?; D. Mishandling and Corruption; E. Crime Victims; F. Vulnerable Informants; G. Witness Intimidation and the Spread of Violence; H. Systemic Integrity and Trust; Chapter 2: To Catch a Thief: The Legal Rules of Snitching.
I. Creating and Rewarding Criminal InformantsA. Police; B. Prosecutors; C. Sentencing and the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines; D. Additional Benefits: Money and Drugs; II. Using Informants as Investigative Tools; III. Defendant Rights against Official Informant Use; IV. Legal Limits: What the Government Can't Do; V. Informant Use in Comparative Perspective; VI. American Informant Law; Chapter 3: Beyond Unreliable; I. Lying Informants; II. Law Enforcement Dependence on Informants; III. Juries; IV. When the Innocent Plead Guilty; V. The Important but Limited Role of Procedural Protections.
Chapter 4: Secret JusticeI. Investigation; II. Plea Bargaining; III. Discovery; IV. Public Transparency and Executive Accountability; V. Informants and the Internet; Chapter 5: Snitching in the 'Hood; I. More Snitches; II. More Crime; III. More Violence; IV. Racial Focusing; V. More Tension between Police and Community; VI. More Distrust; VII. Snitching as a Costly Social Policy; Chapter 6: "Stop Snitching"; I. "In the Game"; II. Distrust of the Police; III. Witness Intimidation; IV. The Role of Rap and Hip Hop; V. What Does "Stop Snitching" Mean?
Chapter 7: How the Other Half Lives: White Collar and Other Kinds of CooperationI. FBI Informants and Organized Crime; II. Political Informants; A. Agent Provocateurs and Infiltrators; B. Political Corruption; III. White Collar Crime and Cooperation; A. Individual White Collar Cooperators; B. Corporate Cooperation; C. White Collar versus Street Snitching; IV. Terrorism; Chapter 8: Reform; I. Defining Informants; II. Data Collection and Reporting on Informant Creation and Deployment; III. Informant Crime Control and Reporting.
A. Legislative Limits on Crimes for Which Cooperation Credit Can Be EarnedB. Limits on Crimes That Can Be Committed by Active Informants; C. Reporting Informant Crimes; IV. Protecting Informants; A. Witness Protection; B. Increase Availability of Counsel; C. Limit the Use of Juvenile, Mentally Disabled, and Addicted Informants; V. Defense Informants; VI. Police Investigative Guidelines; VII. Prosecutorial Guidelines; VIII. Heightened Judicial Scrutiny; IX. Criminal Procedure Reforms; A. Discovery and Disclosure; B. Reliability Hearings; C. Corroboration; D. Jury Instructions.
Summary: Winner of the 2010 American Bar Association Honorable Mention for Books. Albert Burrell spent thirteen years on death row for a murder he did not commit. Atlanta police killed 92-year-old Kathryn Johnston during a misguided raid on her home. After being released by Chicago prosecutors, Darryl Moore--drug dealer, hit man, and rapist--returned home to rape an eleven-year-old girl. Such tragedies are consequences of snitching--police and prosecutors offering deals to criminal offenders in exchange for information. Although it is nearly invisible to the public, criminal snitching has invaded the Amer.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
KF9665 .N38 2009 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt9qgjtj Available ocn779828181

Acknowledgments; Introduction; Chapter 1: The Real Deal: Understanding Snitching; I. Anatomy of an Informant Deal; A. Police; B. Prosecutors; C. Defense Counsel; D. The Crimes; E. The Rewards; II. Implications of Informant Practices; A. Crime-Fighting Benefits; B. Compromising the Purposes of Law Enforcement; C. Who's in Charge around Here?; D. Mishandling and Corruption; E. Crime Victims; F. Vulnerable Informants; G. Witness Intimidation and the Spread of Violence; H. Systemic Integrity and Trust; Chapter 2: To Catch a Thief: The Legal Rules of Snitching.

I. Creating and Rewarding Criminal InformantsA. Police; B. Prosecutors; C. Sentencing and the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines; D. Additional Benefits: Money and Drugs; II. Using Informants as Investigative Tools; III. Defendant Rights against Official Informant Use; IV. Legal Limits: What the Government Can't Do; V. Informant Use in Comparative Perspective; VI. American Informant Law; Chapter 3: Beyond Unreliable; I. Lying Informants; II. Law Enforcement Dependence on Informants; III. Juries; IV. When the Innocent Plead Guilty; V. The Important but Limited Role of Procedural Protections.

Chapter 4: Secret JusticeI. Investigation; II. Plea Bargaining; III. Discovery; IV. Public Transparency and Executive Accountability; V. Informants and the Internet; Chapter 5: Snitching in the 'Hood; I. More Snitches; II. More Crime; III. More Violence; IV. Racial Focusing; V. More Tension between Police and Community; VI. More Distrust; VII. Snitching as a Costly Social Policy; Chapter 6: "Stop Snitching"; I. "In the Game"; II. Distrust of the Police; III. Witness Intimidation; IV. The Role of Rap and Hip Hop; V. What Does "Stop Snitching" Mean?

Chapter 7: How the Other Half Lives: White Collar and Other Kinds of CooperationI. FBI Informants and Organized Crime; II. Political Informants; A. Agent Provocateurs and Infiltrators; B. Political Corruption; III. White Collar Crime and Cooperation; A. Individual White Collar Cooperators; B. Corporate Cooperation; C. White Collar versus Street Snitching; IV. Terrorism; Chapter 8: Reform; I. Defining Informants; II. Data Collection and Reporting on Informant Creation and Deployment; III. Informant Crime Control and Reporting.

A. Legislative Limits on Crimes for Which Cooperation Credit Can Be EarnedB. Limits on Crimes That Can Be Committed by Active Informants; C. Reporting Informant Crimes; IV. Protecting Informants; A. Witness Protection; B. Increase Availability of Counsel; C. Limit the Use of Juvenile, Mentally Disabled, and Addicted Informants; V. Defense Informants; VI. Police Investigative Guidelines; VII. Prosecutorial Guidelines; VIII. Heightened Judicial Scrutiny; IX. Criminal Procedure Reforms; A. Discovery and Disclosure; B. Reliability Hearings; C. Corroboration; D. Jury Instructions.

X. Improving Police-Community Trust and Communication.

Winner of the 2010 American Bar Association Honorable Mention for Books. Albert Burrell spent thirteen years on death row for a murder he did not commit. Atlanta police killed 92-year-old Kathryn Johnston during a misguided raid on her home. After being released by Chicago prosecutors, Darryl Moore--drug dealer, hit man, and rapist--returned home to rape an eleven-year-old girl. Such tragedies are consequences of snitching--police and prosecutors offering deals to criminal offenders in exchange for information. Although it is nearly invisible to the public, criminal snitching has invaded the Amer.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This book examines snitching and the practice of offering leniency to people thought to be criminals in exchange for information about the criminal activity of others. Natapoff (law, Loyola Law School) points out that the use of informants is now standard operating practice in the US, particularly in drug enforcement and white-collar and organizational crime. Two challenges in the use of informants are how to move up the chain of command in settings where offenders most vulnerable to apprehension are at the very bottom of the chain of command, and how to judge the reliability of snitches. The author addresses these and related challenges and suggest reforms: more openness; more data collection; better reporting on the use of informants; and guidelines structuring the use and limits of information gained by informants, and the types of benefits that snitches can receive. The book concludes with a warning about the dangers of "governing through crime," that is, the use of dramatic and exaggerated crime examples to frame solutions to pressing public policy issues. This is a useful book that can be read with profit by practitioners, scholars, and the general public. Summing Up: Recommended. General readers, undergraduate students, graduate students, and professionals. M. M. Feeley University of California, Berkeley

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