We Remember with Reverence and Love : American Jews and the Myth of Silence after the Holocaust, 1945-1962.

By: Diner, Hasia RMaterial type: TextTextPublisher: New York : NYU Press, 2009Description: 1 online resource (544 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780814785232; 0814785239; 0814721222; 9780814721223; 0814719937; 9780814719930Subject(s): Public opinion -- United States | Jews -- United States -- AttitudesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: We Remember with Reverence and Love : American Jews and the Myth of Silence after the Holocaust, 1945-1962.DDC classification: 940.531814 LOC classification: D804.3 .D58 2009Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Preface; Introduction: Deeds and Words; 1 Fitting Memorials; 2 Telling the World; 3 The Saving Remnant; 4 Germany on Their Minds; 5 Wrestling with the Postwar World; 6 Facing the Jewish Future; Conclusion: The Corruption of History, the Betrayal of Memory; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z; About the Author.
Summary: Winner of the 2009 National Jewish Book Award in American Jewish Studies. Recipient of the 2010 Guggenheim Fellowship in Humanities-Intellectual & Cultural History. It has become an accepted truth: after World War II, American Jews chose to be silent about the mass murder of millions of their European brothers and sisters at the hands of the Nazis. In this compelling work, Hasia R. Diner shows the assumption of silence to be categorically false. Uncovering a rich and incredibly varied trove of remembrances--in song, literature, liturgy, public display, political activism, and hundreds of other.
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Preface; Introduction: Deeds and Words; 1 Fitting Memorials; 2 Telling the World; 3 The Saving Remnant; 4 Germany on Their Minds; 5 Wrestling with the Postwar World; 6 Facing the Jewish Future; Conclusion: The Corruption of History, the Betrayal of Memory; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z; About the Author.

Winner of the 2009 National Jewish Book Award in American Jewish Studies. Recipient of the 2010 Guggenheim Fellowship in Humanities-Intellectual & Cultural History. It has become an accepted truth: after World War II, American Jews chose to be silent about the mass murder of millions of their European brothers and sisters at the hands of the Nazis. In this compelling work, Hasia R. Diner shows the assumption of silence to be categorically false. Uncovering a rich and incredibly varied trove of remembrances--in song, literature, liturgy, public display, political activism, and hundreds of other.

Print version record.

English.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Diner (director, Goldstein-Goren Ctr. for American Jewish History, NYU; The Jews of the United States, 1645-2000) refutes the conventional wisdom that the American Jewish community ignored, or actively resisted, discussing the Holocaust until the 1960s. She makes a convincing case that in the post-1945 era American Jews, through their communal and religious institutions, assiduously grappled with the question of how to understand and commemorate the Holocaust, speaking of the destruction of European Jewry in Yom Kippur liturgy, history books, and public ceremonies ,and mobilizing its memory to promote causes such as civil rights and support for Israel. Despite this evidence, why do scholars, lay leaders, and the public today often reject the notion that American Jews discussed the slaughter of European Jewry? Diner postulates that in the 1960s young intellectuals who had little but contempt for their elders argued that they represented "new" ideas in Jewish life. These radicals, on the Right and Left of the political spectrum, went on to become Jewish professionals, including academics in Jewish studies, and promoted the concept that the older generation had ignored the Shoah. An important contribution to American Jewish historiography, this book is recommended for all libraries.-Frederic Krome, Univ. of Cincinnati Clermont Coll., Cincinnati (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Diner (American Jewish history, New York Univ.) seeks in this passionate volume to shatter the widespread myth that US Jews from 1945 to 1962 "had little interest in thinking about, engaging with, and memorializing the Holocaust" (p.4). She demonstrates, based on exhaustive research, that widespread memorialization of the tragedy occurred, a veritable "memorial culture" that even if "disorganized, scattered and spontaneous" (p. 17), included speeches and sermons, liturgy and learning, projects and programs and more. Diner's corrective is important but flawed. It focuses on survivors and engaged Jews, and caricatures and distorts some previous scholarship. It overlooks the highly persuasive volume by Franklin Bialystok, Delayed Impact: The Holocaust and the Canadian Jewish Community (CH, Apr'01, 38-4639), as well as Stephen Whitfield's classic article "The Holocaust and the American Jewish Intellectual" (Judaism 28, no. 4, 1979). Irritating errors mar this volume: "Mrs. Sheldon Black," for example, was really the poet Amy Blank. Nor does Diner adequately explain how the myth she shatters arose, or how Holocaust commemoration differed before and after the 1960s. Nevertheless, her book, coupled with Kirsten Fermaglich's American Dreams and Nazi Nightmares (CH, Feb'07, 44-3460), revises understanding of early Holocaust consciousness in the US. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. J. D. Sarna Brandeis University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Hasia R. Diner is the Paul S. and Sylvia Steinberg Professor of American Jewish History in the Skirball Department of Hebrew and Judiac Studies at New York University. She has taught American Studies at the University of Maryland, College Park, and at Johns Hopkins.

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